... (which) you graduated from.

newlearner

Member
French-France
I would like to make up a sentence.

(1) We will play soccer in the school which John graduated from.

I am going to remove the word, which, from it.

(2) We will play soccer in the school John graduated from.

Is it grammatically wrong to take out the word, which, from the sentence? Thanks for your help.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I suggest:
    We will play soccer in the school that John graduated from.
    We will play soccer in the school that John went to/attended.


    We will play soccer in the school John graduated from.
    This could work but I prefer the version using "that".
     

    newlearner

    Member
    French-France
    Thanks, everyone.

    Can you reposition "from" in the sentence?

    (ex) We will play soccer in the school from which John graduated.

    Thanks again.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    You could but it's very formal for conversation and even most writing these days.
    By the way, you are playing at the school, not inside the building.
     

    newlearner

    Member
    French-France
    Thanks. I should have clarified the use of "in". I was thinking of indoor soccer when I made up my sentences. You are correct. Usually, people play soccer outside. However, my friends and I prefer to play it indoors. Thanks again.
     
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