Whiff

windyvalley

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

Can you tell me if you use the word "whiff" to describe a scenario that someone is sitting by a lake going fishing?

Someone told me it is.

I checked my dictionary and I did not find this useage.

Can you give me an example how you use it in this way?

Thanks in advance!

Windy
 
  • marky1991

    Senior Member
    A whiff is just an uncommon word for "smell".

    Example:
    "Take a whiff of this."
    "I got a whiff of dinner, I'm hungry now."

    Maybe your friend was thinking of Wharf? A wharf is like a dock.

    I may be completely wrong, I can't say that I completely understand what you're asking.
     

    windyvalley

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    A whiff is just an uncommon word for "smell".

    Example:
    "Take a whiff of this."
    "I got a whiff of dinner, I'm hungry now."

    Maybe your friend was thinking of Wharf? A wharf is like a dock.

    I may be completely wrong, I can't say that I completely understand what you're asking.
    Someone told me that whiff is somthing like "go fishing", this is what I am wondering here:confused:

    Thanks!

    Windy
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Someone told me that whiff is somthing like "go fishing", this is what I am wondering here:confused:

    Thanks!

    Windy
    Was there any context for this? I would think so; I mean, it would be odd to have a conversation like this;
    Windyvalley: Hello, how are you today?
    Friend: Fine, thank you. By the way, in English, "whiff" is something like "going fishing". How are you?

    What, then, was the context in which the word was used?
     

    windyvalley

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Was there any context for this? I would think so; I mean, it would be odd to have a conversation like this;
    Windyvalley: Hello, how are you today?
    Friend: Fine, thank you. By the way, in English, "whiff" is something like "going fishing". How are you?

    What, then, was the context in which the word was used?
    :D:D:DGreenWhiteBlue,

    OK, this is a Chinese phrase, it decribes someone sitting by a lake, going fishing.

    As the fishing line is hanging down, it seems to vertical to the rod.one translated into English as "vertical fishing", it is wrong definately.

    But other one said it is "whiffing fishing".

    That is question coming from, Do you say this?

    Thanks for your patience!

    Windy
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I have sat on the shores of too many rivers and lakes, and in too many boats, with a fishing line in the water, and I have never heard the term "whiffing". It may exist, I don't know, unless in some way it relates to the "smell of a fish", "whiff of a bite" (if there is such a phrase) or a suspicion of one's presence, but I doubt it.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    This is certainly the wrong word. As a noun, a "whiff" is a small, quick puff or breath of air, or smoke, or gas, or an odor. As verb, it means to emit such puffs of air, or to move or cause such a little gust of air (for example, in baseball, to swing the bat and miss the ball entirely can be called "whiffing", because one is just hitting air.) As far as I can tell, though, the word has absolutely nothing to do with fishing -- except to describe the smell of fish that were caught too long ago!

    It is vaguely possible that a baseball player, who is familiar with the term "whiff" as it is used in baseball (that is, to strike out), might use this word to mean "I caught nothing":
    Windyvalley: So, my famous baseball player friend, how did your fishing trip go?
    Baseball player friend: Terrible! I just whiffed!

    I suspect that the words you might be looking for are "angling"/"angler"/"to angle" (meaning to fish with a rod and a line.)
     
    Last edited:

    windyvalley

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    ah, I see...,

    I did not find a clue how whiff could be connected with going fishing, and I see that there might be something wrong.

    Thanks GreenWhiteBlue & gasman, have a great night!

    Windy:):)
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hi,

    Can you tell me if you use the word "whiff" to describe a scenario that someone is sitting by a lake going fishing?

    [...]
    Close, but not quite correct.
    whiff (verb)
    To angle for mackerel, etc. from a swiftly moving boat with a hand-line towing the bait near the surface.

    So says the OED. It's not a term I have come across before, despite many, many hours spent in a swiftly moving boat ... fishing for mackerel.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Well, but from what I now understand whiff is to troll what run is to jog, basically a faster version of the same thing, no? Or does one troll from a swiftly moving boat as well?
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Well, but from what I now understand whiff is to troll what run is to jog, basically a faster version of the same thing, no? Or does one troll from a swiftly moving boat as well?
    One did, in one's trolling days.
    When we hit the shoal, the boat stopped and we jigged.

    I wonder if whiff, in this sense, is a regional term. The examples given in the OED suggest west country English.
    Troll, on the other hand, is labelled as US and Scottish.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I have been fishing maybe three times in my life, but I learnt the word "trolling" (which I assumed was connected with trawler), from some friends when fishing as panj describes on the Kafue River amongst the hippos in a boat with an outboard motor. The only whiff was the smoke from the cigars that accompanied the crate of cool beer, Ah, happy memory!
    However, Napoleon, just before becoming First Consul, did eliminate the Parisian rioters very effectively with "a whiff of grapeshot".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top