<While, with> going 280 mph.

kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi, dear all

Last September, British stuntman Richard Hammond nearly died when his jet-powered car crashed while going 280 mph.

This sentence comes from an excerpt ''A Dangerous Living''.

I have no idea why while is used here instead of with. ''with a speed 280 mph'' sounds more nature to me, but I guess author choose while in this sentence in order to make it have a thrilling flavor.

How do you think about it?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I've no idea why you'd use "with". "While" is used because the car was doing 280mph at the time that it crashed.
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    Hi Kenny4528, he did crash WHILE traveling at that speed. It is quite right.
    It could be written "when his jet-powered car crashed at a speed of 280 mph".
    It can not be written as you suggest.
    By the way it is "what do you think about it", not "how do you think...."
    If you ask "how do you think..." the only answer would be "with my brain".
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Hi Kenny4528, he did crash WHILE traveling at that speed. It is quite right.
    It could be written "when his jet-powered car crashed at a speed of 280 mph".
    It can not be written as you suggest.
    By the way it is "what do you think about it", not "how do you think...."
    If you ask "how do you think..." the only answer would be "with my brain".
    Hi, thanks for all of your opinions and corrections.:) :thumbsup:
     
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