whine - mosquito

tigerduck

Senior Member
German / Switzerland
Hello

In a vocabulary exercise, the task is to allocate three words to an animal that are associated with it.

The solution for mosquito says: net, spray, whine

I'm not clear what whine has to do with mosquito. Does it describe the sound that mosquitoes make or does it refer to people whining about mosquitoes?
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    The high-pitched constant noise that a mosquito makes when flying is sometimes called a whine. We use the same word for engines or motors that produce a high-pitched constant noise, such as a jet turbine.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think it is much more common as a noun than as a verb. Do you mean "The mosquito whined?" It is possible but I don't think it is nearly as common as "the mosquito's whine".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it is much more common as a noun than as a verb. Do you mean "The mosquito whined?" It is possible but I don't think it is nearly as common as "the mosquito's whine".
    I'd say it was very common as a verb in BE.

    "The children whined in the back of the car all the way from London to Manchester".

    "The microlights ruined our day in the country, whining overhead".
     

    JazzByChas

    Senior Member
    American English
    In my experience, one usually hears a mosquito buzz, albeit a high pitched one. "Whine", at least according to Dictionary.com, is just making a sound when one wants something, usually in an unhappy manner.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'd say it was very common as a verb in BE.

    "The children whined in the back of the car all the way from London to Manchester".

    "The microlights ruined our day in the country, whining overhead".
    I wasn't saying that "whine" as a verb was rare, only that "the mosquito whined" is less common than "the mosquito's whine". Since then, I have had a chance to look at the results in books.google.com and it appears to me that they are equally common, roughly.

    "Whine" is also very common as a verb in AE. :)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wasn't saying that "whine" as a verb was rare, only that "the mosquito whined" is less common than "the mosquito's whine". Since then, I have had a chance to look at the results in books.google.com and it appears to me that they are equally common, roughly.
    I should have written
    "The microlights ruined our day in the country, whining overhead like mosquitoes"
    or
    "The mosquito whined round the room all night, just like a bloody microlight on a sunny day"
    ;)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Mosquitoes whine, not buzz (that's a bee)... especially when you're under netting and they can't get to you. Then you hear some real whining.
     
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