whine X moan

apblopes

Senior Member
Portuguese, Brazil
This is a part of a lyrics:
"so you can have a little whine and
a moan it's only because you're feeling alone"

When I looked for the meaning of "whine" and "moan" they´ve seemed too similar.
What is the difference?
Thank you.
 
  • foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Whine is high-pitched and nasal and unpleasant-sounding-- whining irritates people. Moaning is a gutty sound, more in the area between the diaphragm and the throat. It's more sustained, lower in pitch, and is more emotional-- the emotion usually involving pain. Whining is attitude making noise-- moaning is suppressed suffering and passion escaping involuntarily, in the form of sound.

    You will often sympathize with a person moaning in pain or grief. Or envy them if the feeling involved is a sexual one-- people moan out of frustration in that case, or sometimes during gratification.
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    This is a part of a lyrics:
    "so you can have a little whine and
    a moan it's only because you're feeling alone"
    When I looked for the meaning of "whine" and "moan" they´ve seemed too similar.
    What is the difference?
    Thank you.



    Hello Apblopes.

    Yes, they are very similar.

    We have a colloquialism in England, "stop whining and moaning all the time." ("stop complaining".)

    whine

    moan





    LRV
     
    Perhaps you didn't read all the meanings, Brioche. Dictionary.com goes on to say -
    1. To utter a plaintive, high-pitched, protracted sound, as in pain, fear, supplication, or complaint.
    2. To complain or protest in a childish fashion.
    3. To produce a sustained noise of relatively high pitch: jet engines whining.


    LRV :)
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Perhaps you didn't read all the meanings, Brioche. Dictionary.com goes on to say -
    1. To utter a plaintive, high-pitched, protracted sound, as in pain, fear, supplication, or complaint.
    2. To complain or protest in a childish fashion.
    3. To produce a sustained noise of relatively high pitch: jet engines whining.
    LRV :)
    Sorry. I was referring just to the first definition: to utter a low, usually nasal, complaining cry or sound.
    I don't agree with the low, usually nasal bit
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    We 'whine and moan' in the US, too. :)

    There's also the slightly more :warn: variation bitch and moan.

    The moaning is an unhappy sound that supposedly accompanies the petulant complaining.
    I would say bitch and moan is more common in the U.S., because I don't think either of these two phrases would be used too often in formal settings, so with friends one can use the word bitch.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I love the implication of the title here - whine times moan —> it introduces a level of mathematics to the noble art of whinging!
     

    Lee Sing

    Senior Member
    English from England
    I would say that Lily Allen is using both words because 'moan' rhymes with 'alone' (the end of the next line), but there are insufficient syllables in the line unless she puts in 'a little whine and a' to make it scan.
     

    leeela552

    New Member
    US English
    The phrase "to have a whine and a moan" means to have sex. In the song (I'm assuming Smile by Lily Allen), she doesn't mean two separate things.
     

    leeela552

    New Member
    US English
    Hello leeela552, and welcome to WordReference.

    Can you offer any support for your suggestion? Urban Dictionary is no help.
    Actually, I can't; it's just slang (or colloquial English for those who don't use slang). :cool:<33333


    Also, do I have to use correct punctuation?
     

    tilywinn

    Senior Member
    Australia, English
    Yeah im with Panj on this one. ‘Whine’ isn’t associated with something pleasurable so I can’t see how it would make sense to have it in a phrase with a sexual meaning. Whining is complaining. Perhaps in some corners of the world ‘whine and a moan’ has a sexual meaning but I don’t believe this is what Lily Allen meant.

    As for ‘groan and moan,’ I know groan can be used with a sexual meaning but groan is different to whine. The difference between groan and whine in my opinion;
    While both can be used when someone is in pain; ‘whine’ is more out of complaint, where as ‘groan’ has the possibility of being associated with desire. From Dictionary.com
    2. a deep, inarticulate sound uttered in derision, disapproval, desire, etc
    The only way I can see ‘whine and moan’ having a sexual meaning is if it were a pun on ‘whine.’ ‘So you can have a little wine and a moan…’ Obviously lyrics/poetry is open to interpretation but I think it would be a far stretch of the imagination to read a sexual meaning into it on this occasion.
     

    emmastaf

    New Member
    english
    I worked in retail and Lily Allen's "Smile" was on our soundtrack CD. The line including the phrase "whine and a moan" was edited out, so I agree that it is probably sexual.
     
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