whipped vs. henpecked?

High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone:

Are these adjectival past participles exact synonyms?

Can they be used interchangeably in a sentence like this( written by myself): "he was henpecked into eating a food he hates."?

You are so whipped/ henpecked ?

Thanks
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Erm ... if this is about what I think it is, I'd say "You are so whipped, dude" and call it a day.
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Is it not clear who is doing what? It is obviously the wife or the girlfriend who is doing the whipping or henpecking, and it is the man who is being whipped or henpecked in eating a food he hates.

    Thanks
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thanks for the context. :) It may be clear to you, but context is one of the things we always require, just to be sure that we are not going to give a misleading answer. It also helps other learners to understand what the thread is actually about.
     
    I think you don't see the type of 'whipping' that's involved.

    Note that the words don't go into active verbs the same way.
    She henpecked her husband. :tick:
    She (pussy) whipped her husband. :confused::eek:

    Is it not clear who is doing what? It is obviously the wife or the girlfriend who is doing the whipping or henpecking, and it is the man who is being whipped or henpecked in eating a food he hates.

    Thanks
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    But a context is a situation. What exactly is going on to make you want to use these words at all? All you have given us is he and a woman making a man eat food he doesn't like. What sort of woman and what's the relationship between them.
    What do you mean by 'whip'? Are you using it with the normal meaning to be hit with a whip or do you really mean 'pussy-whipped'? 'Hen-pecked' is an acceptable word, 'pussy-whipped' is very vulgar slang that might well not be understood, I venture to suggest. In fact I didn't realise that's what you meant until velisarius mentioned vulgarity.
    So, bottom line, they are not synonymous, nor used interchangeably as you'll appreciate if you take the trouble to read the dictionary definitions carefully.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    So, bottom line, they are not synonymous, nor used interchangeably as you'll appreciate if you take the trouble to read the dictionary definitions carefully.
    I'd venture to say that it's a highly specific meaning, even when taking the trouble to read dictionaries carefully. :)

    Dictionaries aren't clear on this.

    Thus the query.
     
    Good points, Hermione. :)

    But a context is a situation. What exactly is going on to make you want to use these words at all? All you have given us is he and a woman making a man eat food he doesn't like. What sort of woman and what's the relationship between them.
    What do you mean by 'whip'? Are you using it with the normal meaning to be hit with a whip or do you really mean 'pussy-whipped'? 'Hen-pecked' is an acceptable word, 'pussy-whipped' is very vulgar slang that might well not be understood, I venture to suggest. In fact I didn't realise that's what you meant until velisarius mentioned vulgarity.
    So, bottom line, they are not synonymous, nor used interchangeably as you'll appreciate if you take the trouble to read the dictionary definitions carefully.
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    But a context is a situation. What exactly is going on to make you want to use these words at all? All you have given us is he and a woman making a man eat food he doesn't like. What sort of woman and what's the relationship between them.
    What do you mean by 'whip'? Are you using it with the normal meaning to be hit with a whip or do you really mean 'pussy-whipped'? 'Hen-pecked' is an acceptable word, 'pussy-whipped' is very vulgar slang that might well not be understood, I venture to suggest. In fact I didn't realise that's what you meant until velisarius mentioned vulgarity.
    So, bottom line, they are not synonymous, nor used interchangeably as you'll appreciate if you take the trouble to read the dictionary definitions carefully.
    No special reason. Just out of curiosity. So, you guys are saying that I can't use "whip" in a passive mood because of the literal meaning of the word. I guess the reason is that It would sound that the wife is using an actual whip in order to force her husband to eat the food.
    Thanks
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    So, you guys are saying that I can't use "whip" in a passive mood because of the literal meaning of the word.

    I did not say that. If you're OK with a possibly vulgar insinuation and the reaction you may possibly get, go ahead.

    Actually, the reason I wanted to use the word “whip” the way I did in #1 was the meaning of “whipped” as an adjective which refers to a man who is submissive to his wife’s needs. That’s why I asked you guys if I could use it that way, which,apparently, I cannot.


    Thanks
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    ...So, you guys are saying that I can't use "whip" in a passive mood because of the literal meaning of the word. I guess the reason is that It would sound that the wife is using an actual whip in order to force her husband to eat the food.
    No, that is not it.
    "You are so whipped" is short for "you are so :warning:pussy-whipped," which, as mentioned above,
    is very vulgar slang.
    "Henpecked" is a word you can use in your grandmother's presence; "pussy-whipped" is not.

    In my opinion--and in the opinion of the Dictionary of American Slang (see below)--"henpecked" and "pussy-whipped" are synonymous,
    but they are of a TOTALLY different register.
    pussy-whipped
    adjective

    Dominated by one's wife or female lover; obsequiously uxorious; henpecked: Francie had had it with bore-ass ''pussy-whipped'' men (1956+)
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    No, that is not it.
    "You are so whipped" is short for "you are so :warning:pussy-whipped," which, as mentioned above,
    is very vulgar slang.
    "Henpecked" is a word you can use in your grandmother's presence; "pussy-whipped" is not.

    In my opinion--and in the opinion of the Dictionary of American Slang (see below)--"henpecked" and "pussy-whipped" are synonymous,
    but they are of a TOTALLY different register.
    Thanks
     
    I note in 2015, several of us agreed on 'vulgar insinuation'. The British tabloid, those slimy rags, seem not to care-- or maybe times have just changed.

    {Meghan's father, in an interview, said this about Harry: }

    “I’d be happy to duel with Harry anytime,” Markle also told The Sun newspaper from his home in Mexico.

    “One round in the chamber. Cocked. Ten steps, turn and fire. That’d settle the score.

    “The way he’s been acting, I think he’d crouch on the ground before he gets to 10 steps.
    He’s a candy ass. He’s whipped,” Markle said of the royal son-in-law he has never met. {Dated January 27, 2020}

    Meghan Markle’s father challenges Prince Harry to ‘man up’ and ‘duel’ with him

    Is "He's whipped" vulgar? Is it far different from 'henpecked'?

    --
    This issue is also discussed in another thread, now closed: Other ways of saying he is "whipped"
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't see how they can be the same.

    Henpecked means nagged and whipped means you're doing things because you're infatuated. A henpecked husband tries to spend time away from his wife to get some relief. They're almost the opposite motivation.

    adjective. browbeaten, bullied, or intimidated by one's wife, girlfriend, etc.: a henpecked husband who never dared to contradict his wife.

    Submissive to or dominated by one's wife or other female partner, frequently with the connotation that this submissive behavior is for the prospect of sex.

    I don't think a henpecked husband is in it for a quid pro quo. He's just stuck in a marriage with an overbearing wife.
     
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    Nickle Sydney

    Senior Member
    I don't see how they can be the same.

    Hen-pecked means nagged and whipped means you're doing things because you're infatuated. A hen-pecked husband tries to spend time away from his wife to get some relief. They're almost the opposite motivation.
    Well, the fact that it's been officially typed (written), printed out, sold out and distributed across the country makes me scratch my head. Is there a really strong sexual connotation which cannot merely pass by you when you either see or hear it?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Let me add that that's how I've always heard it where I live.

    Examples -

    Henpecked:

    - Honey, have you taken out the trash?
    -- Yes, dear.
    - When are you going to finish painting the house? It's been two months.
    -- Soon, dear.
    - You should really talk to the neighbor about all the noise he's making with his lawn mower early in the morning.
    -- I will, dear. As soon as I get back from my fishing trip.
    - You're going fishing again?!
    -- (You bet I am.)

    Whipped:

    - Honey, let's go see that new movie. It sounds really good. (It's a certified "chick flick").
    -- OK, sure. Whatever you want.
    - And then tomorrow I booked us a morning at the spa. Doesn't that sound fun?
    -- Yeah, that sounds like a lot of fun.
    - And don't forget, we have that baby shower to go to in the afternoon.
    -- That sounds great, honey. I'm looking forward to it.

    And as soon as she leaves the room the guy's friends who are over for a visit start laughing hilariously and telling him,

    "You are so whipped, man!"

    She's not nagging him, he's choosing not to tell her he doesn't want to do any of that stuff. Or, alternatively, that's all stuff he never wanted to do before he met her but he's now willing to do to look good in her eyes.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In answer to bennymix, post #17, I'd say that the expression is probably still too "foreign" to offend a British ear very much. It's a fact that swear-words and vulgar expressions in a foreign language don't have the same kind of impact that they do in their native environment. It is, after all, a direct quote from the mouth of an American person.

    I may be wrong about this, but in Britain if we do happen to use "whipped" it's as a more modern version of "henpecked", which may have come to sound dated and perhaps evokes a different stereotype: a dominant, younger, feminist woman, rather than a dominating older housewife.
     
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