white-dark

Fredddd

Senior Member
French
Hi !
Ever heard of that, as in : "Something. Way out in the white-dark." Or could it be just for alliteration sake ?
Context : US YA novel/ winter/"noon sun bleaching the world"(maybe something to do with the white-dark thing)/
narrator on a roof with a gun looking out for trespassing wild animals in the woods
could be "chiaroscuro" half-darkness as far as the meaning is concerned but, once again, I wonder if it's just for alliteration, if the meaning is just "grey" or "shadow".
Could you help me ?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Fredddd. This noun "white-dark" has no established meaning. It is an attempt by some speaker or writer to make up a word that describes some sort of darkness that also has something white in it. Perhaps it refers to white mist that somebody can see early in the morning just before the sun comes up. The landscape is still fairly dark, but a whitish mist is visible as it hovers above the ground...
     
    Last edited:

    Fredddd

    Senior Member
    French
    Thank you Owlman, but, as I said, it's "noon sun bleaching the world"(maybe something to do with the white-dark thing)
    But you helped me clarify the fact that the word "white-dark" is made up and not some teen expression or artistic euphemism that every English reader should know or know of at least.
    I think that I'll stick to my alliteration theory then.
    Thanks again for your poetic effort
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. I'm sorry that I didn't see that noon sun reference in your first post. "White-dark" doesn't make any immediately obvious sense in that context. :rolleyes:
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    With something like this it's really not possible to give a good answer without source, context, and complete sentence.
     
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