who better than a local to help

Saltie

Senior Member
Russian, Russia, Sochi
Hello, everyone!

It's from the English course 'Outcomes'. The text is about couch-surfing.

1) 'Surfers get the advantage of staying with someone who knows the area like the back of their hand. (...) And when people of different cultures meet, who better than a local to help with social skills?

Is there a typo in the phrase in bold or is it corrrect English? It seems to me that the phrase should be worded, e.g., like this:

2) ... meet, who can be better than a local to help with social skills?
 
  • User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S. - Texas)
    It's correct English. "Who better than" is a relatively common expression.

    If it helps, you can imagine that "can be," "could be," or something similar is elided.
     
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