Who do you want to marry?

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  • Mike2947

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    So there is no need of "whom"?

    Another example:
    "They need to know who they have to consult with." British Version I guess
    "They need to know with who they have to consult." American Version I guess
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Mod note: Mike, your opening post sounds like a proofreading request, which is not allowed in this forum. (Proofreading requests are generally deleted.) It looks as if you are interested in the distinction between who and whom. It would be helpful to make the focus clear in the opening post.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    So there is no need of "whom"?
    Yes, there is a need of "whom", since it's the object of the verb "marry".

    Another example:
    "They need to know who they have to consult with." British Version I guess
    "They need to know with who they have to consult." American Version I guess
    Both are incorrect and require whom instead of "who".
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    As Parla explained, whom is required because it is the object of the infinitive to marry, with you being the subject.

    However, such a sentence will often be heard in the flow of conversation. Speakers of English have been confused by the separate nominative and accusative forms of pronouns for some time, probably because all other declensional distinctions between subjects and objects have disappeared. One should not write such a sentence unless:
    (1) one is deliberately imitating spoken English, or reporting exactly a statement;
    (2) one is being careless.
     

    Tracer

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have to disagree here. The distinction between who/whom is one without a difference. At least in American English, both spoken and written, WHO has largely replaced WHOM, which is becoming archaic.

    You can see WHO in newspaper headlines, for example, all the time------> WHO WILL YOU VOTE FOR? (No newspaper would write: WHOM WILL YOU VOTE FOR?)

    In spoken English, sentences such as WHO DID YOU SEE AT THE STORE? are now standard. No one would say: WHOM DID YOU SEE AT THE STORE? and so on....
     
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