Who dressed you?

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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Can you ask a kid what in this way? ("Ask" needs a direct object as well as an indirect object (a kid).)
    What do you want it to mean?
    ("Who dressed you?" is often a disparaging remark about how ugly your clothes are.)
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Can you ask a kid what in this way? ("Ask" needs a direct object as well as an indirect object (a kid).)
    What do you want it to mean?
    ("Who dressed you?" is often a disparaging remark about how ugly your clothes are.)
    OK. If that is in your country then I will take it in that way. However, many little kid and of course dogs cannot get dress all by themselves. so, how should I ask this question so that it only seems like a question and not a taunt.

    Can I say,

    Who helped you in wearing this dress?
     
    Last edited:

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps, "Who helped you get dressed today?" (I doubt that the dog would take "who dressed you" as a taunt. :D)

    It might help us if you mentioned the context; why you would want to ask a child this.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Perhaps, "Who helped you get dressed today?" (I doubt that the dog would take "who dressed you" as a taunt. :D)

    It might help us if you mentioned the context; why you would want to ask a child this.


    Who helped you in wearing this dress?
    Who helped you in getting dress in this costume.

    Which one these two should I use, provided one of them is correct?

    In India, kids wear sarees on special occasion, but I can bet very few will be able to wear it without anyone's help.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Who helped you to put that costume on?
    Who helped you to dress up in that costume?
    Should I say this in case of a saree as well? Saree is a traditional dress and can be worn on many occasions. It's not a fancy dress.
    and what is the problem with the use of " wearing"?
     
    Should I say this in case of a saree as well?
    You could:
    Who helped you put on your sari?
    Who helped you put your sari on?

    what is the problem with the use of " wearing"?
    Because it is wrong. The person in the sari is wearing it, and no one is helping her do that. What they helped her do is put it on.

    To say that someone is helping someone else wear an item of apparel suggests that a person is holding the item of clothing up, or keeping it from falling off the wearer's body. I suppose that you could say that the page is "helping" the Queen wear her robe in this picture:


    but that would not be the ordinary way of expressing the idea; you would instead say that the page is carrying her train, and that certainly is not the way most people wear clothes.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    1. Yes, but I wouldn't call a sari a "costume". The sari is everyday dress for many people, whereas all the pictures in #5 are "fancy dress" (Americans have a different term for this, that I've forgotten) i.e. very exceptional clothing for parties or carnival.

    2. To put on a costume/dress/sari/pair of trousers is to wear it for the first moment that day as explained by GreenWhiteBlue in #8.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    You could:
    Who helped you put on your sari?
    Who helped you put your sari on?


    Because it is wrong. The person in the sari is wearing it, and no one is helping her do that. What they helped her do is put it on.

    To say that someone is helping someone else wear an item of apparel suggests that a person is holding the item of clothing up, or keeping it from falling off the wearer's body. I suppose that you could say that the page is "helping" the Queen wear her robe in this picture:


    but that would not be the ordinary way of expressing the idea; you would instead say that the page is carrying her train, and that certainly is not the way most people wear clothes.
    1. Yes, but I wouldn't call a sari a "costume". The sari is everyday dress for many people, whereas all the pictures in #5 are "fancy dress" (Americans have a different term for this, that I've forgotten) i.e. very exceptional clothing for parties or carnival.

    2. To put on a costume/dress/sari/pair of trousers is to wear it for the first moment that day as explained by GreenWhiteBlue in #8.
    Wonderfully explained again by two of you. :)
     

    semeeran

    Senior Member
    Indian Tamil, India
    1a. I was wearing my sari.
    1b. I wore/dressed my new sari.
    2a. I was putting on my sari.
    2b. I put on my new sari.
    How do English native people consider the above sentences?
    Please comment. Thanks.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    1a. I was wearing my sari. :tick: This describes what I looked like.
    1b. I wore my new sari. :tick: This describes what I looked like.
    1b. I dressed my new sari. :cross: This has no real meaning. Perhaps you meant I was dressed in my new sari?
    2a. I was putting on my sari. :tick: This describes what I was doing at 7:45.
    2b. I put on my new sari. :tick: This describes what I did at 7:45.
     

    pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Can you ask a kid what in this way? ("Ask" needs a direct object as well as an indirect object (a kid).)
    What do you want it to mean?
    ("Who dressed you?" is often a disparaging remark about how ugly your clothes are.)
    With the notable exception of Hollywood stars, who are dressed by Chanel and Dior.
     

    semeeran

    Senior Member
    Indian Tamil, India
    1. I dressed in my new sari.
    2. She dresses in her smart clothes.
    Are these sentences acceptable?
    Please comment. Thanks.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Perfectly. They are equivalent to
    1a. I put on my new sari.
    2a. She puts on her smart clothes
    2b. She wears her smart clothes.

    Why are the last two identical, you may wonder. This is because they're in the present tense. So they may suggest a single action (what I called the "7:45" action in #12) or they may suggest a habit; we don't know without more information. (Clearly "She is dressing in..." would refer to a single 7:45 action.)
     
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