Who flies high, falls deep

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by jana.bo99, Dec 5, 2010.

  1. jana.bo99

    jana.bo99 Senior Member

    Slovenia
    Cro, Slo
    I don't believe that this phrase was in the Forum at all.
    We use it, here.

    Slovenian: Kdor visoko leta, nizko pade

    Croatian: Tko visoko leti, nisko pada


    I hope that is right from both sides: theory and praxis

    B.
     
  2. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    Russian:
    Literal varian - Кто высоко летает, тот низко падает.
    But there is much more expressive modern variant:

    Быстро едешь, тихо понесут. (If you ride fast you will be carried slowly [in the funeral train]).
     
  3. jana.bo99

    jana.bo99 Senior Member

    Slovenia
    Cro, Slo
    Thank you for Russian translation.

    Sorry, but I must write here, how we mean it: the best example was Hitler. He wanted to be the Boss of the whole World and on the end he ended in a bunker and after in the grave.

    спасибa!

    B.
     
  4. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch:
    Wie hoog mikt (aims), valt diep. But my feeling is that the second part is quite common and remains the same, whereas we feel free to change the first part...
     
  5. ilocas2 Banned

    Czech
    Czech:

    Kdo vysoko létá, nízko padá
     
  6. jana.bo99

    jana.bo99 Senior Member

    Slovenia
    Cro, Slo
    ThomasK,
    Your comment is perfect (even, if nobody's perfect).

    Of course we all end in the grave, but not so as Mister H. over there.

    This phrase means also: the higher is fly, the deeper is fall (it depends, how high we want).

    B.
     
  7. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I meant it as a linguistic comment though ;-) : I meant that we seem to use the second part more often than the first. The fall is predicted or ascertained for lots of people having too much ambition, trying too hard, etc.

    But that reminds: "Na hoogmoed komt de val" ! I.e.: after pride, hubris (too high a courage/ a feeling, let's say) there's the fall.
     
  8. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese: Quanto maior o voo/a altura, maior a queda. (lit. The higher the flight/the height, the bigger the fall.)
     
  9. catlady60

    catlady60 Senior Member

    Nazareth, PA
    English-US (New York City)
    In English: The bigger they are, the harder they fall.
     
  10. sakvaka

    sakvaka Senior Member

    Finnish:

    Is this the same?

    Source: Wikiquotes
     
  11. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Well, as for myself, the Finnish hereby win the prize for originality and alliteration. And I suspect it does mean the same as in the title. Well-done, Finland!
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2010
  12. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    Two more in Russian:

    Чем выше взлетишь, тем больнее падать.
    Lit.: The higher you fly up, the more painfull is your fall.

    Чем больше шкаф, тем громче падает.
    The bigger a cupboard the louder it falls.
     
  13. Orlin Banned

    София
    български
    Bulgarian: който лети/хвърчи високо, ниско пада.
     
  14. jana.bo99

    jana.bo99 Senior Member

    Slovenia
    Cro, Slo
    As nobody is here to write it in German, I will:

    German: Je höher der Flug, desto tiefer der Sturz

    B.
     
  15. jana.bo99

    jana.bo99 Senior Member

    Slovenia
    Cro, Slo
    The bigger they are, the harder they fall
    ("good" for them)


    I like it, because is in original English language!

    B.

    p.s. Phrases or Proverbs are difficult to translate to get the right meaning.
     
  16. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I am sorry, but could you spell it out, Orlin, and explain ? Thanks !
     
  17. Orlin Banned

    София
    български
    The English transliteration is "koito leti/hvarchi visoko, nisko pada". The literal meaning and the idea of the phrase is the same as in Slovenian, Croatian and other Slavic languages (see above) - the meaning is roughly "who thinks too/extremely highly of himself (implied by "flying high"), ends badly (implied by "falling low")."
     
  18. ilocas2 Banned

    Czech
    One more in Czech:

    Pýcha předchází pád - Pride precedes (goes before) fall
     
  19. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Hungarian
    Hungarian: Aki sokat markol, keveset fog. [lit.: He who grasps much hold little]
     

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