who is diplomat in residence and lecturer

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
Analysts and diplomats in Washington will be watching for “the gradual insertion of the Young General into the policy and decision-making apparatus,” said Evans J. R. Revere, a longtime United States diplomat in South Korea and Asia who is diplomat in residence and lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton. ---taken from the NYT

Dear all,

I have looked diplomat up in dictionaries where it is listed as countable noun. So I was wondering whether there should be an "a" before the bold diplomat. May I have your opinons? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I too find it slightly odd. We omit the article quite often in such contexts, but only when the title or position mentioned is held by only one person. For example, we would say "who is head teacher at X", but not "who is teacher at X" (the latter would have to be "who is a teacher at X").

    There may be no such issue with "diplomat in residence", but certainly there is with "lecturer", as we can reasonably assume he is one of numerous lecturers at that particular institution. Hence why it sounds a little odd.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I too find it slightly odd. We omit the article quite often in such contexts, but only when the title or position mentioned is held by only one person. For example, we would say "who is head teacher at X", but not "who is teacher at X" (the latter would have to be "who is a teacher at X").

    There may be no such issue with "diplomat in residence", but certainly there is with "lecturer", as we can reasonably assume he is one of numerous lecturers at that particular institution. Hence why it sounds a little odd.
    Thank you, cropje. :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I too find it slightly odd. We omit the article quite often in such contexts, but only when the title or position mentioned is held by only one person. For example, we would say "who is head teacher at X", but not "who is teacher at X" (the latter would have to be "who is a teacher at X").

    There may be no such issue with "diplomat in residence", but certainly there is with "lecturer", as we can reasonably assume he is one of numerous lecturers at that particular institution. Hence why it sounds a little odd.
    Your US correspondent here. I'm in complete agreement with the above.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    I think it would be correct if it were "Diplomat in Residence" (with the initial capital letters), because it sounds like a formal title; "lecturer" should be preceded by "a", because he is one of many at the institution.

    So then it would be:

    "...who is Diplomat in Residence and a lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton."
     
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