Who of you like(s) beer?

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Pepa123

Senior Member
Czech - the Czech Republic
Hi!

I wonder if all of these questions are correct:

1) Who of you likes beer?
2) Who of you like beer? (The persons guesses that there will be more positive answers than one)
3) Which of you likes beer?
4) Which of you like beer? (The persons guesses that there will be more positive answers than one)

Thank you very much.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I prefer "which" to "who", and I would naturally use the singular verb, as if I am addressing them each individually (but with "how many" it would be "How many of you like beer?")

    All four of your sentences are correct.
     

    D D

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Which of you likes beer? Is gramattically correct in my view. It takes third person singular verb.
    1. Which of you is Jerry and which of you is Josh.
    2. which one of you is gonna tell?
    These are some examples that may help you understand.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Who among you likes/like beer?

    This would be grammatically correct, with (I think) either singular or plural verb, but it sounds very old-fashioned.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I wonder if all of these questions are correct:

    1) Who of you likes beer?
    2) Who of you like beer? (The persons guesses that there will be more positive answers than one)
    Those don't work at all for me either as singular or plural, and I wouldn't use them. :(
     

    D D

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    As a matter of fact, all of your sentences are gramattically right. But this is not what a native speaker would use. I'd say " Do any of you like beer"? To the same meaning.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    As a matter of fact, all of your sentences are gramattically right. But this is not what a native speaker would use. I'd say " Do any of you like beer"? To the same meaning.
    I said that above.;)
    'Who of you' sounds awkward although it's technically correct. I prefer the verb in the plural.

    That said, I'd be far more likely to ask "Do any of you like beer?".
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Who likes beer?:tick:
    Who here likes beer?:tick:
    Who in this group likes beer? :tick:

    Which one of you likes beer?:tick:
    Which group of you likes beer?:tick:


    Which of you likes beer?:confused:(is that "which one" or "which group"? what are you asking?)
    Who of you likes beer? :confused: (is that a singular "who" or a plural "who"? what are you asking?)

    If a sentence is ambiguous, it is the fault of the speaker. Many sentences have ambiguous grammar, but are usable if there is also non-verbal context making the meaning clear. But many "correct" sentences are not usable sentences.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Who likes beer?:tick:
    Who here likes beer?:tick:
    Who in this group likes beer? :tick:


    Which one of you likes beer?:tick:
    Which group of you likes beer?:tick:


    Which of you likes beer?:confused:(is that "which one" or "which group"? what are you asking?)
    Who of you likes beer? :confused: (is that a singular "who" or a plural "who"? what are you asking?)

    If a sentence is ambiguous, it is the fault of the speaker. Many sentences have ambiguous grammar, but are usable if there is also non-verbal context making the meaning clear. But many "correct" sentences are not usable sentences.
    Ah, I wonder if this is an AmE/BrE difference.

    "Which one of you likes beer?" sounds to me like you know that one person (and presumably only one person) likes beer, and you are trying to discover which person it is. I really cannot imagine saying "Which group of you likes beer?"

    "Which of you likes beer?" (or any of the other sentences in post #1) doesn't imply any knowledge of who or how many people within the group like beer - it may be all of them, it may be none, or anything in between.

    "Which of you likes beer?" might not be my most common way of asking this question, but it is well within the range of possibilities.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Ah, I wonder if this is an AmE/BrE difference.

    "Which one of you likes beer?" sounds to me like you know that one person (and presumably only one person) likes beer, and you are trying to discover which person it is. I really cannot imagine saying "Which group of you likes beer?"
    I doubt it because I agree with you.:)

    I would probably say "Who here likes beer?"

    Or, more specifically, if it's the real intended meaning, "Who here wants a beer?"
     

    Pepa123

    Senior Member
    Czech - the Czech Republic
    Thanks to all of you. The context would be this: I´m supposed to make a survey among my friends. I need to learn "how many of them" (and who specifically) like beer, how many of them (and who specifically) went on holiday abroad last year etc. So, there are four of us sitting at a table and I´m asking them my questions:

    1) Who / Which of you (= the people I´m sitting here with) like(s) beer?
    2) Who / Which of you (= the people I´m sitting here with) went on holiday abroad last year?
    3) ...

    I´m not sure if this specification changes anything for you ...

    Would you still prefer "Who here likes beer? Who here went on holiday abroad?"?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    For a survey, I would use a direct question: "Do you like beer?" All of the other forms of words suggest you are offering them a beer. However, you could use any of your four original questions, or "Who here likes beer?"

    There isn't a single correct way of asking this question.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Who is a pronoun that does not change when its referent is plural or singular - the verb agrees with the referent. In "Who likes/like beer?" there is no context, and thus no possibility of giving an accurate answer.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Who...? is normally singular.
    Who wants a drink?

    If I know/suspect that several or all of the people I'm speaking to want a drink, I'd still say "Who wants a drink?" Similarly with "Who likes beer?" I could expect one or several people to respond to that question.
     
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