Who wants to go to the park? -- I am

Hi guys,

I'm watching an American action thriller film, Kidnap, 2017. A waitress says to her son, a little boy: "Who wants to go to the park?". And the kid answers: "I am". Why not "I do"?

Is it just how kids say?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s absolutely not the normal reply, of course. Whether this kid spontaneously came out with “I am” rather than “I do” (which is entirely likely) or it was actually in the script is anybody’s guess! :D
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I couldn't find a script with those lines. And the movie is not on Netflix. So no way to double check. But there is definitely a problem. Even a small child would not make that mistake.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, it makes no sense. I thought something earlier said might explain it, but I can't see anything.

    I really wish I could watch it.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Keep in mind that almost all "scripts" on the Internet are drafts or transcripts by often anonymous people. A real screenwriter wouldn't format a script that way.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm watching an American action thriller film, Kidnap, 2017. A waitress says to her son, a little boy: "Who wants to go to the park?". And the kid answers: "I am". Why not "I do"?
    Can you actually hear him say that?
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It's a scripted and edited film.

    It's not a documentary of real people speaking.

    Some possibilities.

    Scriptwriter thought this was cute kid- speak.

    Child actor got his lines wrong but producer thought it was cute, or didn't notice until too late to get kid back to overdub.

    The actors rehearsed "who is ready to go the park?/ I am" but actress changed her wording in the final take while child had "I am!" memorized.

    The actress's lines were redubbed or shot again later for technical reasons but the child's were not.

    A film is a scripted piece of fiction made under complex conditions that involve shooting scenes out of sequence, redubbing, even shooting scenes with multiple actors where they aren't all present at once. Child actors in particular have legal limits on how long they can work, as well as practical limits on how much repetition they will put up with.

    When a nonsequitur like this slips into an unimportant part of a film it is more likely a relic of the complex construction of film rather than an accurate indication of speech patterns.

    Most film dialogue is highly stylized anyhow.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I managed to listen to the clip. It's a small boy and he doesn't say the d clearly but he definitely says "I do". It just sounds like a normal lack of clear articulation in a smaller child who is excited.
     
    I managed to listen to the clip. It's a small boy and he doesn't say the d clearly but he definitely says "I do". It just sounds like a normal lack of clear articulation in a smaller child who is excited.
    I've posted the link to Ponyprof, so I hope he or she can watch this clip to hear the sounds.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I've posted the link to Ponyprof, so I hope he or she can watch this clip to hear the sounds.
    My phone tends to seize up when I click on links out of here 😏

    If the kid really says I do! my post above is redundant but it's worth keeping in mind for future film watching. Films get audio errors just like print gets typo errors, and films are not examples of real speech.
     
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