wholesale layoffs

sincerelyyours

Senior Member
spanish
Hi! I would like to know the meaning of this phrase in the following statement. Thanks in advance.


"Walker angered Democrats and union members last year when, shortly after taking office, he signed legislation that effectively ended collective bargaining for public employees in Wisconsin. The Republican governor presented the measure as necessary to avoid wholesale layoffs, although opponents said it was simply a way of dividing public-sector unions from private unions to weaken labor’s political clout in the traditionally strong union state."

http://articles.boston.com/2012-06-06/news/32082155_1_bargaining-for-public-employees-collective-bargaining-exit-polls
 
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  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The answer to your question is in the dictionary here.


    Concise Oxford English Dictionary © 2008 Oxford University Press:
    wholesale/ˈhəʊlseɪl/

    adjectivedone on a large scale; extensive.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    wholesale = a large number of. - From wholesale business where a company will buy large amounts of goods from the manufacturer and sell them on to smaller retailers
    layoffs
    (noun)= redundancies, sackings, firings, dismissals (from employment) to lay something off = to remove something
     

    sincerelyyours

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Thanks. ...then, the phrase above discussed means that the governor wants to avoid putting (placing??) a large number of people out of work?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Mr. Sdgraham, how about ...the governor wanted to avoid putting a large number of people out of work?
    You're missing the point. That's what the governor said he wanted and was the reason for what he did.

    Journalists cannot know whether he had an ulterior motive and as such, can only report what he said. Neither journalists nor the readers are mind readers.

    The reason the distinction is particularly important here is that the issue in the U.S. state of Wisconsin is highly emotional and filled with acrimonious charges.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    ...how about ...the governor wanted to avoid putting a large number of people out of work?
    To get it right, more info from the text is needed: The governor presented the measure as necessary to avoid putting a large number of people out of work. (As sdgraham points out, 'to want' and 'to present a measure as necessary' aren't synonymous.)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    From my experience there are three types of layoffs:

    1. Strategic layoffs. In this case a person might be fired because he has underperformed, his job is no longer required for the company, or some other specific reason.
    2. Last hired, first fired. Unions frequently require that the people with the most tenure be fired last.
    3. Wholesale layoffs. Large blocks of layoffs without any selection process at all.
     

    sincerelyyours

    Senior Member
    spanish
    You're missing the point. That's what the governor said he wanted and was the reason for what he did.

    Journalists cannot know whether he had an ulterior motive and as such, can only report what he said. Neither journalists nor the readers are mind readers.

    The reason the distinction is particularly important here is that the issue in the U.S. state of Wisconsin is highly emotional and filled with acrimonious charges.
    Got it! Thanks!
     
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