Wholesome (adjective) = whole (noun) + some (suffix)

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baab

Senior Member
Vietnamese
some
a native English suffix formerly used in the formation of adjectives: quarrelsome; burdensome.



Is this definition right for the word "wholesome"?
Wholesome (adjective) = whole (noun) + some (suffix)
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes it is correct but you are not because 'whole' is not a noun but an adjective.

    whole = hale = healthy (in its old meaning)
     

    baab

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Thanks Biffo,
    I wonder why we don't use "whole" as an adjective instead of "wholesome" in the following sentence.
    I love biking for the same reason everyone does: Few wholesome activities provide the exhilaration and sense of physical well-being that cycling does.
    Source:http://www.nypost.com/
    Both "whole" and "wholesome" have the same meaning. Are they interchangeable?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Because, as Biffo says, whole = healthy is an old meaning, it does not work like that on its own these days.
     
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