wholesome texture

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redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
The spring onions and mushrooms retain their crunch, and the gently browned prawns add a wholesome texture to each bite.

http://www.timeoutbengaluru.net/food/eating_out_details.asp?code=243&source=5

The sentence is extracted from a Korean food review

A cursory google search shows that wholesome food is conducive to well-being, which I don't think can be applied in this context. Is "wholesome texture" used with regard to the feeling you get from a bite?
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Whereas [wholesome food] may well be conducive to well-being, the adjective wholesome when not modifying food, has the meaning of "pleasant, agreeable, very acceptable, innocent, natural, etc."
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thanks. Maybe it is a word particular to food writing because I found it uncommon in food reviews. I read it as a pleasant, fulfilling feeling from chewing
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I also find myself puzzled by this use. I'm thinking about the textures of various foods, and I can't imagine thinking that the texture of browned prawns is more "wholesome" than that of, say, bread, carrots, or ice cream.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm with Parla and others: "wholesome texture" doesn't make much sense to me.

    That said, people often use words in a way they think will be "sexy" or "trendy": I think that's what's happening here....
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It has been used in that manner for some time; OED
    Wholesome 3.b. transf. of a quality, condition, place, etc. (often approaching sense 1.a. Conducive to well-being in general, esp. of mind or character; mentally or morally healthful; tending or calculated to do good; beneficial, salutary.).

    a1616 Shakespeare Othello (1622) iii. i. 45 In wholesome wisedome, He might not but refuse you.
    1871 R. H. Hutton Ess. II. 63 A wholesome busy city like Manchester.
     
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