"Wholesomest" or "most wholesome"?

  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    To be safe, I would use "most wholesome," but I must admit that "wholesomest" doesn't sound too bad ... and Wikitionary lists it, although they're hardly at the top of the reference guides. :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "This is one of the the most wholesome/wholesomest stories I've ever heard"
    But what is the context? I see "wholesome" still being used to describe food items, but it has gone out of fashion in other areas. Few would admit today to being so boring as to seek only "good, wholesome fun".

    So "wholesomest" strikes me as unusable in ordinary contexts. I could stomach "the wholesomest and tastiest bread on the market", but I would only talk about "the wholesomest stories" if I were joking .
     
    Last edited:

    StayLam

    Member
    Portuguese
    But what is the context? I see "wholesome" still being used to describe food items, but it has gone out of fashion in other areas. Few would admit today to being so boring as to seek only "good, wholesome fun".

    So "wholesomest" strikes me as unusable in ordinary contexts. I cold stomach "the wholesomest and tastiest bread on the market", but I would only talk about "the wholesomest stories" if I were joking .
    The context would be more like meaning something positive. A wholesome story seems like a story about good morals and evokes virtuous feelings or something like that. At least that's how I've seen the word being used lately.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The comment made in #5 is not correct. Only 'wholesome', 'more wholesome' or 'the most wholesome' are acceptable.
    Strange things are being done to the comparatives and superlatives in uneducated speech these days.
     
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