Who's for chicken?

bloomcountry

Senior Member
Russian, Spanish
Does this mean that "God" is asking who is eating/having chicken or who wants to have chicken? Thanks:

"The front door slams. Knocked moths fly off toward Mars.
[...]
Each dark room lit by a billion stars, each one more choice--
In a stirring of souls, God clears his voice:
Who's for chicken? He says. Pass the chicken.

("God Blows the Whistle", Ray Bradbury)
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Who's for [chicken]? is a colloquial way to ask Who wants [chicken]?
    (At least it is in American English. I am not certain whether it works in British English.)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I can't find the rest of the poem on the internet. What is it about?

    It's no longer true, but for a long time chicken was considered a special dish, the kind of thing to be served to guests and for dinner on Sunday ~ traditionally the best meal of the week. Perhaps there is something in that association.
     

    bloomcountry

    Senior Member
    Russian, Spanish
    The poem is about the author's own fond memories of his childhood, when he lived in his home village and used to play in the lawns with lots of children in summer. In the last section of the poem there is a sad turn, it is when the poet (Ray Bradbury) remembers the death of one of his little friends, a little beautiful girl who was also very good at the piano but "God" took her. It is quite a sad poem, thanks a lot for your help.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Thank you for the summary. :)

    It seems to me that he is remembering the Sunday dinners of his childhood and the chicken served there. God takes the place of the head of the household ~ Bradbury's father, probably ~ and offers chicken to everyone present.
     
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