whose gold-ringed eyes cruelty has extinguished, might look as looked that sightless Samson

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Charlotte Brontë – Jane Eyre (Chap. 37) | Genius

Quotation: His form was of the same strong and stalwart contour as ever: his port was still erect, his hair was still raven black; nor were his features altered or sunk: not in one year’s space, by any sorrow, could his athletic strength be quelled or his vigorous prime blighted. But in his countenance I saw a change: that looked desperate and brooding—that reminded me of some wronged and fettered wild beast or bird, dangerous to approach in his sullen woe. The caged eagle, whose gold-ringed eyes cruelty has extinguished, might look as looked that sightless Samson.

Context: Jane had first seen Mr. R since she fled Thornfield Hall one year ago. The gentleman, once with keen eyes and muscular arms, was completely blind with his left arm amputated.
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Hi everyone! I don’t quite understand the bold part. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

whose gold-ringed eyes cruelty has extinguished => cruelty has extinguished the eagle’s gold-ringed eyes
to extinguish => 1. d : to dim the brightness of : ECLIPSE [M-W dictionary]

the sentence => the caged eagle, whose gold-ringed eyes has been blinded cruelly, might look as that Samson-like sightless Mr. R looked.
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Extinguish doesn't just mean to dim, but to put out completely. So, yes, Mr Rochester is compared to an eagle which has been caught, put in a cage, and blinded cruelly, as well as to Samson. (You are familiar with the story, aren't you? The story can be found in Judges 16.)
     
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