Why does the word 'reunion' belong to the group?

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi teachers,
The exercise says, Circle the word that does not belong in each group. The answer is 'team'.
I don't get, why the word 'reunion' belongs to the group. Could you tell me the reason please?

a. reunion b. picnic c. team d. barbecue

Thanks in advance.
 
  • xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Reunions, picnics, and barbecues are kinds of social gatherings. A team is not. Look at meaning #2 for "reunion" in the Word Reference dictionary.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I can imagine that causing quite few natives to suck their teeth! At a stretch you could say that reunion, picnic and barbecue are all types of party, but a picnic and a barbecue could also be a solitary affair - if it was just me and Mrs Andygc we'd have a pleasant picnic, but it wouldn't be a party. I can think of other possibilities, but I also think some context might help - did this question come in a group of questions looking at a particular aspect of language?
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Reunions, picnics, and barbecues are kinds of social gatherings. A team is not. Look at meaning #2 for "reunion" in the Word Reference dictionary.
    Hi,
    Thank you for your reply. Of course it can be a family reunion, I just thought about it in terms of work.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi,
    Thank you for your reply.
    At a stretch you could say that reunion, picnic and barbecue are all types of party, but a picnic and a barbecue could also be a solitary affair - if it was just me and Mrs Andygc we'd have a pleasant picnic, but it wouldn't be a party.
    That's right. Reunions can also be at work, can't they? Or they are just meetings.

    Did this question come in a group of questions looking at a particular aspect of language
    Not really, just as a part of an exercise.
     
    Last edited:

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Thank you for your reply. Of course it can be a family reunion, I just thought about it in terms of work.
    Well, certainly. A barbecue can also be the grill you cook the meat on, and as Andy says, a picnic can be just one or two people. I think the point is that all of them could be types of social gatherings, in the right context.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Well, certainly. A barbecue can also be the grill you cook the meat on, and as Andy says, a picnic can be just one or two people. I think the point is that all of them could be types of social gatherings, in the right context.
    Hi,
    I do think so too.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The trouble with this question is that it is based on trying to group nouns with incomplete concordance.
    You can say they are all social gatherings - they may be, but they don't have to be.
    They can all be prefixed with the word family - but this is supposed to be a test of English, not word association.
    You could also argue that team is the odd one out on the basis that it is the only one that cannot be prefixed by "team" :rolleyes:

    If the question was "circle the word that is the odd one out" it might be a better question.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I don't think the difference is whether or not they are classified as social gatherings. Reunions, picnics, and barbecues are all events, whether they are attended by two or two hundred. "Team" doesn't belong in the list because it's not an event.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I don't think the difference is whether or not they are classified as social gatherings. Reunions, picnics, and barbecues are all events, whether they are attended by two or two hundred. "Team" doesn't belong in the list because it's not an event.
    Hi,
    Thank you very much for your opinion.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    Reunions can also be at work, can't they? Or they are just meetings.
    The English word "reunion" does not have quite the same meaning as the Spanish word "reunión." A work meeting in English is not a reunion. An English reunion has the sense of people getting together after a while of not seeing each other--a family reunion of relatives who live in different states, a college reunion of people who went to school together and graduated 10 years ago, etc. You would almost never have a work reunion, other than perhaps a business closed down 20 years ago and all the workers are getting together again to remember old times.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Here's my answer (essentially the same as Parla's).

    a. reunion b. picnic c. team d. barbecue

    They all fit into the following sentence except for team.

    The ______ is scheduled to take place on July 1st.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    On a second thought, isn't an "event" also each of several particular contests making up a sports competition?
    Often, yes. But that has nothing to do with the present question. As Biffo points out (post #14), an event (whether in sports or not) is something that happens, something that takes place. A team is not a happening; it's a group of people.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The English word "reunion" does not have quite the same meaning as the Spanish word "reunión." A work meeting in English is not a reunion. An English reunion has the sense of people getting together after a while of not seeing each other--a family reunion of relatives who live in different states, a college reunion of people who went to school together and graduated 10 years ago, etc. You would almost never have a work reunion, other than perhaps a business closed down 20 years ago and all the workers are getting together again to remember old times.
    Hi,
    Thank you for your comments. They are very helpful.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Often, yes. But that has nothing to do with the present question. As Biffo points out (post #14), an event (whether in sports or not) is something that happens, something that takes place. A team is not a happening; it's a group of people.
    Hi,
    It's crystal clear and thank you for correcting me on this one, 'On a second thought'. It's one of my mistakes.
     
    Last edited:

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Listen to Parla. The question is trying to distract us with the semantics of the words, when the correct answer is based on their syntax.
    The semantic difference between Sp. "reunión" and Eng. "reunion" doesn't matter: both of them—like a barbecue or a picnic—are events that can be scheduled.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Listen to Parla. The question is trying to distract us with the semantics of the words, when the correct answer is based on their syntax.
    The semantic difference between Sp. "reunión" and Eng. "reunion" doesn't matter: both of them—like a barbecue or a picnic—are events that can be scheduled.
    Hi,
    Thank you for your help too.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top