Why is German so deviant?

kgulbran

New Member
english usa
I was told that the Russian use of Nemetz (mute) for German was due to the Hanseatic league using sign language to conduct business. Anyone able to confirm that?
 
  • Schwichtenhövel

    Banned
    Germany / German
    .....

    English = German.... Spanish = Alemán.... Italian = Tedesco... German = Deutsche (sp?)... </p>
    Whereas for, let's say, Spanish.... English = Spanish.... Spanish = Español.... Italian = Spagnolo.... French = Espagnole.....

    They are all very similar for other languages, just not German. Anybody know the origin or reason of this?

    It's because the germans always wanted to be someone special. Look at me, I'm a german! So the other nations agreed and gave them special names... No. I'm afraid that is not quite right. As far as I remember, it had been already Caesar who wrote a book called 'Germania'. Alemán, almao (portug.???) and allemand might derive from 'alemannisch', and I believe that even today there is a Swiss tribe called the 'Alamannen'. But I'm not sure. The point to be sure is the origin of these: deutsch, teutsch, duits (Nederlande), tysk (swedish???, danish?), tedesco. They all derive from something like - no clue, thiudisk or thiudesk? Might be East Gothic. So there are not too many names para las cabezas cuadradas. Only three. Look at me! Look at me!
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    I was told that the Russian use of Nemetz (mute) for German was due to the Hanseatic league using sign language to conduct business. Anyone able to confirm that?
    Hi and welcome!

    I would be surprised to hear that the Slavic word Němec (this is the Czech version) appeared only after the Hanseatic league was founded (14th century).

    Jana
     

    Schwichtenhövel

    Banned
    Germany / German
    Schwichtenhövel, are you referring to the Alemannen and their language Alemannisch?

    Actually, I don't thoroughly know what about I had been talking. I just remembered the word in question in a very dark region of my brain that was not in use for years. I believe there is an 'Alamannische Fasnacht' which should be the carnival in some Swiss area...

    It is not important.
     

    konungursvia

    Banned
    Canada (English)
    My two cents (after reading many excellent replies): we must not forget that there were numerous small German "nations" comparable to North America's indigenous nations or tribes, each of which at times warred and traded with neighbours in various parts of Europe. The concept of a German nation is only a couple hundred years old, as many contributors pointed out above. Each language group thus arrived at a separate consensus on what to call "its" Germanic neighbour, whence the variations, and errors, on what they have been called. The Flemish and Netherlanders have also been called Dutch, for instance, and were among those Teutonic tribes perceived as a collectivity by others over the last couple thousand years. An interesting story, isn't it? Those darned Tysklanders!
     

    Schwichtenhövel

    Banned
    Germany / German
    "Those darned Tysklanders!"


    Yes, one has to bear one's cross, I experience that every day when staring in the mirror. I would pay a million for having been born as a Monegasque. They have the most cash in Europe...
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Getting back to the original question, what makes you think that German is so "deviant"? What about Basque, for instance? The other languages you quoted were Romance languages or ones strongly influenced by them. If you started quoting some of the other Teutonic-influenced languages such as Dutch ("duits"), Swedish ("tysk") etc. you'd see that German isn't so far out after all. Or have I misunderstood the original query?
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    You may have. The original query was about why there are such different words for "German" in different languages. :)
     

    beclija

    Senior Member
    Boarisch, Österreich (Austria)
    Someone has mentioned that the English word "Dutch" is a cognate of "Deutsch". An interesting parallel that I think has not been mentioned here is that the Arabic word [nîmsâ] for "Austria" is a cognate to Slavic "Nijemac" (Croatian, this one).

    The reason is very similar in both cases, in my opinion: Up until rather recently, there was no coherent notion to cover all and only what is now Germany - in any language (someone mentioned the 1870s already). So when the need arose for a term for Germany as opposed to Austria, Arabic applied the earlier, more generic term to Austria and borrowed a new word for Germany ([almânijâ]) - remember that at the time there was still the Ottoman and Habsburg empires, so for a Syrian, Palestinian or Iraqi, Austria would have been a neighbouring country with whom you would potentially involve in trading or go to war any time, while Germany was a largely irrelevant state half a continent away.
    A slightly different hypothesis would be that Morocco adopted the Spanish word to mean all "Germans", while in the Ottoman Empire, the South Slavic term was used, and when the need to differentiate arose, they found it convenient to have two terms already and just standardized their terminology (I think the second variation is more in line with the fact that the language is called [almânijja] rather than [nimsawijja]). If you have read Karl May, you may remember that he still used "Nimsa" to refer to all "Germans", notably himself who is from Saxony.

    The parallel with "Dutch" is that a few centuries earlier, there was no concieved reason to distinguish between Dutch and Germans either, and when it did arise, the English had way more contact with the Dutch than the Germans further to the east (presumably also called "Dutch" before) and for convenience sticked to the old term referring to them while introducing a new one for "German".

    So, in my opinion, the basic reason for the international terminological chaos is that for most of history, there was no reason to refer to all and only "Germany" or "Germans", so languages would (in many cases) just take the name of the nearest German tribe and generalize it when it became meaningful to do so.
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    In that case, the answer is surely that it depends on which "branch" of languages they come from: Romance, Germanic, etc., which is what I was trying to say. I'm sure that if you took a less Indo-European-centric view you'd find that e.g. oriental languages' words for German are probably no more different from Western European languages than are their words for, say, French or Spanish. (Wait for someone to contradict me :))
     

    beclija

    Senior Member
    Boarisch, Österreich (Austria)
    Here we go... I don't think any East Asian (I always get it mixed - does Oriental mean East Asian or Middle Eastern in Britain? Same argument anyway, except for Greece and possibly some other places in the Eastern Mediterranean) language will have a very original name for any European country. They probably just adopted the Portuguese names when the Portuguese opened trade in the 16th century, or alternatively, if the Portuguese didn't think the country in question important enough to talk about it, they use the name its nationals used to introduce themselves.

    Granted, there might have been a lot of phonetic adjustment, often making the word unrecognizable. Say, the language in question doesn't have "f" and "r" and disallows consonant clusters: "France" will come out as something like "Palanasi", maybe shortened to Pala-"land". But these are rather predictable changes, on a par with Tyskland - Duitsland - Deutschland.
    The "outragious" thing about Germany (more or less the same for Greece) is that, besides these, there are totally unrelated names like "Saksa", "Vācija", "Allemagne", "Njemačka", and "Germany". I think the chance that you find an Oriental language that hase an unrelated name for any European country is about as high as finding a European language where China is called "Prulong".

    I wouldn't be surprised to learn, though, that China has a dozen unrelated names in, say, Tibetan, Korean, Burmese, Vietnamese, Mongolian etc... (Btw, I think our European names derive from Arabic (Sîn), which again picked it up in India, and it is indeed unrelated to the Chinese.)
     

    alisonp

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    You could be right: probably "oriental" was a bad choice for a group of languages, but it was the only one that came to mind. In the UK, it would refer to Japanese/Chinese/Korean etc. - the very Far Eastern languages. Wonder how Germany is referred to in the East European languages ...
     

    konungursvia

    Banned
    Canada (English)
    Germany is referred to in the East as "德国" or "De guo", an ingenious way of using a polite word "De," or "virtue" that sounds something like Deutsch. (guo means country in Chinese, and nearly all Far Eastern languages use the Chinese construction even though not directly related to Chinese, such as the Koreans and Japanese.)
     

    konungursvia

    Banned
    Canada (English)
    Addendum: the Chinese have always been very clever at reinventing suitable Western names in their totally unrelated language. Consider the Biblical David, translated as 大卫, or "Da wei", i.e. "Great Defense". I believe "Da wei" is quite close to the original Hebrew pronunciation.
     

    beclija

    Senior Member
    Boarisch, Österreich (Austria)
    Wonder how Germany is referred to in the East European languages ...
    It's been mentioned in some detail in the thread, or maybe you go to Wikipedia and check the links to the other language editions;) (Germany should have an article in most editions).
    Vokietija (Lithuanian) Vācija (Latvian), Nem-c- in various varieties in Slavic languages (Croation Njemačka, Polish Niemcy, etc.), Saksa in Finnish and Estonian, and Germania in Romanian.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Germany is referred to in the East as "德国" or "De guo", an ingenious way of using a polite word "De," or "virtue" that sounds something like Deutsch. (guo means country in Chinese, and nearly all Far Eastern languages use the Chinese construction even though not directly related to Chinese, such as the Koreans and Japanese.)

    In Japanese, it is pronounced like "deishi go" (go meaning language): ドイツ語. It reflects the pronunciation of "deutsch" or "duits."
     

    Kaschiller

    Banned
    Romania
    Hi, everybody
    Right on my alley of thought.
    I have been trying to find out the etymology of the word DACIA ( ancient name for Romania ), a sound alike with DeutchLand and Dutch.( DACH ), but they are a litle different though.
    DACIA , originally DAGAE (in some ancient maps ) means Land . Trajan, the roman emperor called this land ( today's Romania ) , DACIA FELIX ( elix -icis [fruitful , fertile]. Transf., [of good omen, favorable, bringing good luck; fortunate, lucky, successful]; Felix, [the Lucky One, surname of Sulla]. Adv. feliciter, [fruitfully; auspiciously, favorably; luckily, successfully]
    Now, in romanian DUSH = SHOWER and DUH = SPIRIT. So, DutchLand it could be 'Land of many rivers' or' Land of lots of Rain' .

    But Ud as in ( ud(rom)=wet(eng) ) , usually is present in words that have to do with reproduction. Uterus, Udder, so it is related to birth . Nations were taking names as ' WE THE PEOPLE ' - TEUDA, TEUTA (celtic), TUZI ( rom), like in TODO(span) , TOT(rom) meaning ALL.

    Here are some proto-germanic words for PEOPLE:

    Proto-Germanic: *?iud?; *?iudana-s
    Meaning: people
    IE etymology:
    Gothic: ?iuda f. (?) `people, nation; heathen, gentiles'; ?iudan-s m. (a) `king'
    Old Norse: ?j?? f. `Volk'; ?j??an-n m. `Fürst, König' (poet.)
    Norwegian: tjod
    Swedish: gotl. tjaud
    Old English: ??od, -e f. `nation, people; district occupied by a people, country; language'; { ??oden `king, lord, God' }
    Old Frisian: thiade
    Old Saxon: thiod, thioda; thiudan st. m. `ruler, lord ofvthe people'
    Middle Dutch: diet; holl. duutsc, vlam. dietsc
    Dutch: duits
    Old High German: thiota, thiot `Volk' (8.Jh.); thiutisc (um 1000)
    Middle High German: diet st. f., n., m. 'volk, leute', st. m. 'mensch, kerl'; diutisch, diutsch, tiutsch, tiusch, mitteld. d?desch, d?tsch, d?sch 'deutsch'
    German: Deutsch
    Comments: lat.-germ. Teutoni

    So, DeutchLand = Land of the People!

    GERMANY
    In romanian we have GER = FROST, ICICLE, COLD WEATHER ( gello)
    One possibility will be German - People from the cold land
    Gheara - sharp, Claw
    Ger - Spear so Germany = People with spears
    In Romanian Jertfa=Sacrifice ...Ancient Dacian used to send messengers to their God , Zamolxes by throwing the chosen one on top of a bed of spears.
    In this case Ger = Jer = Spear.
    Greek GERAKI = HAWK , simbol on the German Flag!
    Germans - Hawk People!?

    NEAMTS ( romanian )
    Related words:
    Neam = Relatives , which is synonim with the latin Germanus
    (germanitas -atis f. [the relationship between brothers or sisters; brotherhood , sisterhood].
    germanus -a -um [having the same parents]; m. or f. as subst. [own brother , own sister]. Transf., [brotherly, sisterly; genuine, real, true]. Adv., germane, [faithfully, honestly].

    Nimici (neemeechee) = To destroy

    Nametsi (rom) - Hills of snow, deep snow

    Here is what weekipedia has:
    From Latin "Germania", of the 3rd century BC, of unknown origin. The Oxford English Dictionary records theories about the Celtic roots gair ("neighbour") (from Zeuß), and gairm ("battle-cry") (from Wachter and from Grimm). Partridge suggested *gar ("to shout"), and describes the gar ("spear") theory as "obsolete". Italian, Romanian, and other languages use the latinate Germania as the name for Germany.

    The rest here

    You might want to see this also:
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_for_Germany
     

    yuggoth

    Senior Member
    Spain.Castellano.Catalán.
    What a coincidence, we were talking about this yesterday in German class! Ralf is pretty close to the mark, it started 2000 years ago with the Romans and a guy named Cornelius Tacitus in AD 98, a Roman historian. The people living in the area known as Germany were dispersed and "barbaric" (to the Romans), so he called him, in Latin, Germanen. When the Romans went north, they brought language, culture, and technology with them. Some of the tribes allowed themselves to become latinized, these were the French (for the most part).

    There are a few reasons other lands call Germans by different names, but mostly it's due to the fact that the German people were semi-nomadic and had no major cities or unification beyond language. That is to say, they were not a well defined nation. For instance, most European nations have one major city, like Paris, or Rome, that is clearly the center. But in Germany, you don't really have that. Berlin is trying to become that center, but 1000 years ago there wasn't a cultural or economic center.

    Anyway, the English called the Dutch people the Dutch (and the Germans call themselves "deutsch"), but then they heard from the Romans of these other people past the Dutch, these Germans, so they called the country Germany (Germania in Italian). Many other languages call the Germans something related to "foreigner" or "stranger".

    As far as the origin of the word Deutch and Deutchland, the Teutons and Charlemagne (Karl der Grosse in German, or "Karl the Big Guy") had a lot to do with it. The Teutons threated the Roman Empire 113-101 BC, they called themselves "teutonisch", from which "deutch" is a derivative. Karl der Grosse started using this word and spreading it's popularity.

    Well there's a nutshell discription, there's a lot more to it than that but if you were just curious, hopefully this satiates you.
    At that time,most of the peoples who formed what today is called "England" were in what today is known as Denmark (Anglo) and part of Germany (Saxon).The people who lived in (Great) Britain were...the celtic Britons.
     

    yuggoth

    Senior Member
    Spain.Castellano.Catalán.
    I'm also really impressed. I didn't know all these facts yet, but I can add that there might have been some certain tribes that founded their nations in other contries. Because it isn't different from nation to nation as the word "Deutsch" is called, since in Spanish it's Alemán, in Arabic 'almaanii ( ألمانى ), in French allemand (almost the same stem) and with German (English): the proper Latin word is Germanus/Germanicus that means something like brotherly/true/..., in Hebrew it's germanith ( גרמוית ). And I think the Chinese word is also something like this with the same stem.

    But I cannot find a proper word in another language for tedesco.

    Nevertheless, Tede did a good job and I don't know what to add any more.
    In Chinese, the name is "Dé-guó",which comes from "De-sha-lan" (adaptation of Deutschland) and guó (country).
    I know the writing in chinese caracters,but I don't know how to type them.
    "Tedesco" is a form of "teuton",but modified by the time and the diference of language.It existed in old Spanish too the form "tudesco"
     

    yuggoth

    Senior Member
    Spain.Castellano.Catalán.


    Like everyone else I appreciate this thread very much. However, the above quote puzzles me quite a bit. I have never seen such an explanation for the expressions the Slavic people use for the Germans. Here's what I incidentally posted in another thread a couple of days ago:



    I checked into this again. I find it very unlikely that we borrowed from Italians in those distant times. The connection between "němý" (mute) and "Německo" (Germany), "němčina" (German, the language), "Němec" (German, the person), "německá" (German, the adjective), on the other hand, is very clear.

    This is what I was told at school. This explanation is also widespread in the Czech internet. I haven't discovered a single source supporting what Apus wrote.

    Jana
    I had been looking for this answer for years!!Thank you the maximum.
    I'm not from the slavic world,but I find logical that explanation.
     

    yuggoth

    Senior Member
    Spain.Castellano.Catalán.
    Alamann was the name of a German tribe established on the sides of the Rhine and in Switzerland. The name has nothing to do with Arabic. Not all names beginning with al- are Arabic. The Arabic word is a borrowing from either Spanish or French. The root of Alamann is al- from which are also Greek allos "other", English else, alien, Old High German Elisâzzo Elsaz (French Alsace): the land on the other side of the Rhine.


    I have heard that it comes from alles-mensch, "all the men",since that tribe was actually a confederation.Could it be true or is it a fantastic etimology?
     

    yuggoth

    Senior Member
    Spain.Castellano.Catalán.
    [/left]

    I guess you mean 德国 (de2 guo2). In Japanese, they use an adapted form of the Dutch "Duitsland:"

    ドイツ語 - doitsu go = German language
    Yes,that's true,but names of countries that today have in Chinese an ending in "guo" (country) had formerly allonger form, so Fa-guo (France) was Fa-lan-xí, Ying-guó (England) was Ying-ge-lán,and so on...
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    And the term Wealh was applied by Germanic people to Romance speakers. It might have meant something like "foreigners".

    Related words are Vlachoi (6th cent. Byzantine), Wallachians, die Welschen, die welsche Schweiz, olasz, and Welsh.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I knew that the German word deutsch came from a Gothic word meaning people (cf. Scandinavian tysk and Italian tedesco), just as Bantu is the the plural of Muntu (also man), and that the rest of the names mostly derive from the names of individual Germanic ribes, but what about the Russian nyemyetski, which I vaguely remember is derived from some quite unpleasant Russian word meaning something like enemy. I fear I have no means, myself, of checking this.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    In all (?) Slavic languages, the word for Germany is derived from "mute", as I said in post 14. Russian was specifically mentioned in post 33. :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In re: Dutch-Deutsch
    When people hear terms in a language not their own, they often use similar-sounding words from their own language.
    On my mother's side of the family, my ancestors came from what is now Germany/Deutschland and settled in the state of Pennsylvania.
    The story that I got in German class was that the American corruption of Deutsch to Dutch comes from that quirk to apply familiar-sounding terms rather than the non-native original and thus my ancestors were called the Pennsylvania Dutch even though they were Germanic.
    Thus, in earlier times in the U.S., particularly during the rather heavy immigration of German/Deutsch -speaking peoples, folks with Germanic names often gained the nickname (sobriquet) of "Dutch."
    "Dutch" Schultz, an American Gangster of the past century, is an example.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    The story that I got in German class was that the American corruption of Deutsch to Dutch comes from that quirk to apply familiar-sounding terms rather than the non-native original and thus my ancestors were called the Pennsylvania Dutch even though they were Germanic.
    That story is not accurate. You should read the first pages of this thread and the links in it. "Dutch" is not a misreading of "Deutsch"; it's simply a word whose meaning has changed over time and space.
     

    ed6514

    New Member
    USA, English
    I was looking for references to the Italian word "tedesco."

    I am appreciative of Mr. Magoo's explanation. It makes sense to me that "tedesco" would come from "theotisce" rather than directly from "Deutsch." Is my thinking correct?

    Thanks for this site. I am glad that I found it!
     

    Erutuon

    Member
    English, USA
    In case anyone's interested, the Old English for German Deutsch (and Dutch Duits, Icelandic þýska, etc.) is þéodisc, the Modern English equivalent of which might be *Thedish (judging from the Oxford English Dictionary's thede), or perhaps *Theech (judging from High German's diutisc -> Deutsch). ;)
     

    zpoludnia swiata

    Senior Member
    chile english, spanish, german
    Interesting the idea that alemán comes from Arabic. Much more probable is that it comes from the Germanic tribe the Allemani (Allemanen=all the men, all the people). Those were the ¨Germans¨ with whom people farther to west had contact with.
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    According to what was said earlier in this thread, Allamann did not mean "all the men", but rather "the men from the other side". "The outsiders", as it were. :)
    I must have missed that post #12 you are referring to, but Apus could at least have mentioned that (s)he found this explanation in footnote number 6 of the Wiki-article on the Alamanni, a footnote triggered by the explanation in the main article that "the etymology [alamanni - all men] has remained the standard derivation".

    The footnote doesn't mention that some people think that "al-" refers to the Alle River. This explanation I found in my favourite French dictionary, which by the way, definitely prefers "all-men".

    On the other hand, many of the names of Germanic tribes were originally given by people who did not belong to that group. (Compare with the simple example "Chinese"). So, all in all, "the Others" is not that impossible.

    It's only later that Romanised Germanic tribal leaders writers, being very well aware of the Latin and even Greek literary traditions, used those names to refer to their band, whether or not their group had connections with the "original" tribe.
    It may be an exaggeration, but in those days 'tribal' names seemed to have been wandering around Eurasia even more than the so-called 'tribes' themselves...
    And a name like Alamanni (written in half a dozen of ways) was and still is easy to re-interpreted.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    Erutuon

    Member
    English, USA
    As far as it goes, "all men" (or the equivalent in Proto-Germanic, Alamanniz) is the etymology the Oxford English Dictionary gives.
     

    Blacklack

    Senior Member
    Russian
    ...Nem by the Hungarians, Neamts by the Romans, Niemcy by the Poles, Nemdzios by the Modern Greeks,Nemets by the Russians, these words are related to Italian nimico "ennemy" (The eastern European peoples having suffered many invasions by the Germanic tribes have come to call them "the ennemy").
    Thank you for so much examples. They seem to prove that Protoslavic root emerged quite early, even before Slavic population reached southern Balkans in 6-7 centuries A.D.
    Your Roman etymology is something quite new to me as well as many people here. Sounds interesting anyway.

    Like everyone else I appreciate this thread very much. However, the above quote puzzles me quite a bit... I checked into this again. I find it very unlikely that we borrowed from Italians in those distant times.
    Well, the times being 5th century A.D. or a bit earlier, that would've been nothing strange. Roman-speaking people lived already in modern Romania and were likely to have some contacts with Slavs. Besides that Roman-speaking people could be living in modern-day western Hungary (Roman province of Pannonia), i.e. also in the vicinity of ancient Slavs.

    The connection between "němý" (mute) and "Německo" (Germany), "němčina" (German, the language), "Němec" (German, the person), "německá" (German, the adjective), on the other hand, is very clear.
    This is what I was told at school. This explanation is also widespread in the Czech internet. I haven't discovered a single source supporting what Apus wrote.
    That explanation is widespread in all the Russian-speaking world too, I believe. It's very simple and "obvious". Still that doesn't prove it right automatically. There's another explanation — Slavic root having derived from a German tribe name "Nemeti" (see "Nemetes" in Wiki).
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    The Italian word tedesco goes back to Late Latin teutiscu(m), ultimately from Gothic thiuda, “people”. Obviously, the German form deutsch also comes via Latin, and – together with tedesco – it means “popular; vernacular [language]”.

    As to the historical background, see Charlemagne, f.ex. in Wikipedia.
    :) :)
     

    89ten

    Member
    german
    The Italian word tedesco goes back to Late Latin teutiscu(m), ultimately from Gothic thiuda, “people”. Obviously, the German form deutsch also comes via Latin, and – together with tedesco – it means “popular; vernacular [language]”.

    As to the historical background, see Charlemagne, f.ex. in Wikipedia.
    :) :)
    How can deutsch come from Latin if the cognate is present in gothic?
    The same root was used to describe not only Goths, Guttiuddai, also early English, Angel-teod and Swedes, Sui-tjod. It means people; the same root was used to describe Celtic tribes. It goes back to proto Germanic and proto Indo-European. The Latin Tedesco doesn’t have to come from gothic since it is a proto Indo-European cognate.
     

    dinji

    Senior Member
    Swedish - Finland
    Tedesco is certainly a loanword from Germanic, because there is no trace of the PIE semivowel /w/.

    The German word deutsch is however a true cognate to ia. Gothic and Swedish.
     

    89ten

    Member
    german
    Sure, Tedesco must be a Germanic cognate in Italian; after all it refers to Germany, although I don’t understand the role of semivowel “w” here. What is PIE root for this cognate?
     

    Hulalessar

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The explanation that the Slavic word for "German" comes from a Slavic word meaning "mute" is unconvincing. First, it cannot surely be the case that the Slavs thought the German tribes could not speak at all. Secondly, if you are going to call a people after the way they speak then a word meaning "mute" hardly seems applicable. One would expect a word meaning something like "babbler" or "stutterer" to be used.
     
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