why t weakening ?

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MrMagoo

Senior Member
Westphalia, Germany; German
gaer said:
I find BE and AE equally clear or impossible to understand, according to diction and region. Scottish English, although technically BE (is it?), because it is part of the UK, is SO different. But I do enjoy listening to the Scots and the Irish, because the accents are so musical. :)

Gaer
I was in Ireland about two years ago - an internet forum meeting-up, 7 people from USA (Nevada, Louisiana); Ireland, Scotland, and Germany.
I haven't spoken a word to anybody in that forum before this meeting ;)
I had absolutely no problems in understanding those nice two ladies from the US-west coast, very clear and articulate English, wow!
The Louisianan accent was a bit harder to understand, but I got used to it pretty soon.

The Scottish guy... *lol* his accent was... just wow! I mean, I swear I couldn't really get any complete sentence! I had to be sure to snap up at least every other word and conclude all the rest from the context - incredible!! And I was SO happy, when my Irish friend told me that even she had tremendous problems in understanding his accent!! *phew*

The Irish accent is really lovely - not that hard to understand, but there's one thing that totally cracks you up in case you don't know that before: The intonation!
Every sentence sounded like a question to me as the Irish people raise their pitch in the end of every sentence!!
I didn't know that when I arrived in Ireland, no one told me! So in the first two days, I was always like wanting to answer something - being confused as there was nothing to answer! *lol* It was a marvellous experience I can tell you... what a fantastic accent. ;)
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    MrMagoo said:
    The Irish accent is really lovely - not that hard to understand, but there's one thing that totally cracks you up in case you don't know that before: The intonation!
    Every sentence sounded like a question to me as the Irish people raise their pitch in the end of every sentence!!
    I didn't know that when I arrived in Ireland, no one told me! So in the first two days, I was always like wanting to answer something - being confused as there was nothing to answer! *lol* It was a marvellous experience I can tell you... what a fantastic accent. ;)
    Could I gently point out that this is not a universal Irish habit? There are some of us who have been infected by the Australian habit of ending every sentence with an antipodean terminal pitch uplift - implying to you and to me that the sentence is a question.
    Dare I ask the age of the Irish people you were talking to?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    panjandrum said:
    Could I gently point out that this is not a universal Irish habit.
    I don't know without a question mark - Is that a question or a statement with an "antipodean terminal pitch uplift "?;)

    (Fantastic phrase by the way - it puts me in mind of a mad Australian farmer poking a hay loft with a pitchfork while his wife and lover try to miss the prongs!:D )
     

    MrMagoo

    Senior Member
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    panjandrum said:
    Could I gently point out that this is not a universal Irish habit? There are some of us who have been infected by the Australian habit of ending every sentence with an antipodean terminal pitch uplift - implying to you and to me that the sentence is a question.
    Dare I ask the age of the Irish people you were talking to?
    They are 50 years old (on an average). I talked to younger people as well, of course. I don't know anymore though if they had the same "pitch-quality" *lol*

    I didn't want to generalize this phenomen, it was just something I could notice when I was there.

    Are you sure that it is an Australian habit?! I have a few good friends in Down Under. One of them (East coast) I call every once in a while - I could never notice he has such a 'pitch' my friend in Ireland has... .
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    MrMagoo said:
    I didn't want to generalize this phenomen, it was just something I could notice when I was there.

    Are you sure that it is an Australian habit?! I have a few good friends in Down Under. One of them (East coast) I call every once in a while - I could never notice he has such a 'pitch' my friend in Ireland has... .
    Interesting - This didn't happen at all until Australian soaps (Neighbours and Home & Away) came to UK TV. All of the younger characters in both do this terminal uplift thing. Shortly after, I noticed my kids and others starting to imitate it. I had thought it only happened to people under 30, but it seems that some older people have fallen victim to it as well.
     
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