wicked

cuchuflete

Senior Member
EEUU-inglés
If you are from New England, please don't answer, at least until others have had a chance. Also, please do not look in a dictionary.

The question is, what does the word 'wicked' mean as most commonly used where you live?

Thanks,
Cuchuflete

PS- I'll tell you what it means in my village after hearing from other speakers of whatever variety of EN.
 
  • Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    cuchuflete said:
    If you are from New England, please don't answer, at least until others have had a chance. Also, please do not look in a dictionary.

    The question is, what does the word 'wicked' mean as most commonly used where you live?

    Thanks,
    Cuchuflete

    PS- I'll tell you what it means in my village after hearing from other speakers of whatever variety of EN.
    Well, Cuchu, to me wicked means evil. But I don't think it is used very much around here in that sense anymore. One might say of, for example, a tennis player, ''he has a really wicked backhand''. So I guess it could be used as to mean good and/or powerful. Sort of like using ''bad'' to mean ''good''.
     

    Robert Bennie

    Banned
    Australia - Australian
    G'day cuchuflete
    My 17 year old daughter and her mates in Byron Bay use wicked to indicate the most wonderful interpretation possible. A wicked outfit is a wonderful set of clothes. A wicked surfboard is the best available. It is not applied to people.

    On a similar note Koori people use 'deadly' in exactly the same manner but the word is also applied to people.

    Robert
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    cuchuflete said:
    If you are from New England, please don't answer, at least until others have had a chance. Also, please do not look in a dictionary.

    The question is, what does the word 'wicked' mean as most commonly used where you live?

    Thanks,
    Cuchuflete

    PS- I'll tell you what it means in my village after hearing from other speakers of whatever variety of EN.
    Strong, effective.

    Man, did you see that serve? It had a wicked slice on it. (Very good, effective serve.)

    Wicked curveball, same thing.

    I tend to associate it with sports or with something that has speed.

    I use "evil" when I am thinking of the more tradational meaning.

    Also:

    I have a wicked headache (really BAD headache). So serious, really bad.

    G
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Robert Bennie said:
    G'day cuchuflete
    My 17 year old daughter and her mates in Byron Bay use wicked to indicate the most wonderful interpretation possible. A wicked outfit is a wonderful set of clothes. A wicked surfboard is the best available. It is not applied to people.

    On a similar note Koori people use 'deadly' in exactly the same manner but the word is also applied to people.

    Robert
    Same here, Robert!

    But I've heard "deadly" only applied in the same way, not to people, and not for pain… And not for clothes…

    G
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    jacinta said:
    On the west coast, wicked has been replaced. The new words are sick and pimp. Wicked was used a few years ago now.
    I suppose like the flu, slang moves from west to east. Hopefully ''sick'' and ''pimp'' won't replace ''wicked'' here for a few more years. :)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    jacinta said:
    On the west coast, wicked has been replaced. The new words are sick and pimp. Wicked was used a few years ago now.
    Could you give some example sentences?

    I've never seen these words used this way. :)

    Gaer
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Sick means cool.
    Pimp means cool.
    Wicked means cool.

    I'm waiting for pimp to disappear. I don't even think kids know what a pimp really is (they probably do). People dress pimp. They just use the word as if it means nothing. My own kids started using it and I would say with shock, What are you saying?! Sick is used much more. Everything's sick. "Oh, sick! Where'd you get that? Sick, I want that CD. That is so sick!"

    They will soon be replaced by something else.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    jacinta said:
    Sick means cool.
    Pimp means cool.
    Wicked means cool.

    I'm waiting for pimp to disappear. I don't even think kids know what a pimp really is (they probably do). People dress pimp. They just use the word as if it means nothing. My own kids started using it and I would say with shock, What are you saying?! Sick is used much more. Everything's sick. "Oh, sick! Where'd you get that? Sick, I want that CD. That is so sick!"

    They will soon be replaced by something else.
    Interesting. We can never be sure, but I think these will not be around long (pimp, sick). :)

    Gaer
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    *hijack alert*
    about sick: i don't really think its that new, its just a modification of the idea of something being sickening in a figurative way.

    "shes so intelligent it's sickening".. to use sick to idicate the superlative isn't such a great leap :)
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    cuchuflete said:
    If you are from New England, please don't answer, at least until others have had a chance. Also, please do not look in a dictionary.

    The question is, what does the word 'wicked' mean as most commonly used where you live?

    Thanks,
    Cuchuflete

    PS- I'll tell you what it means in my village after hearing from other speakers of whatever variety of EN.
    Cuchu KIA;

    I will answer before I get to the end of the thread..so forgive me if this is duplicated...
    'wicked'..what does it mean here....besides me you mean !!!:D
    It is used for both good and bad...
    'That was one wicked show we went to last night'..good
    'That was one wicked storm last night.'..bad
    'She is so wicked.' (wink..wink)..naughty
    Now I take my wicked self off to the end of the thread to see just how wrong I was...
    te gato;)
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Maybe I live close enough to disqualify myself, so I'll just say it means, in addition to the definitions already posted here, that if the person you are talking to uses wicked in a sentence and is not referring to an old witch, s/he is

    1. probably from New England, or
    2. is recounting the Saturday Night Live skit "Wicked", written and perfomed by Dratch & Fey
     

    Monkling

    Member
    NY
    US - English
    lsp said:
    2. is recounting the Saturday Night Live skit "Wicked", written and perfomed by Dratch & Fey
    or the Broadway show - which is the first thing that popped into my head when I first saw the subject line.

    The use of wicked seems to be fading around here. My kids (17 & 20) don't use it.
     
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