wicket in cricket

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kemot

New Member
Polish - Poland
Hi,
I am trying to understand the cricket jargon. I found the following definition of a wicket:

Wicket One of those ubiquitous words that is central to the game of cricket. The word can be used to describe the 22 yards between the stumps, the stumps collectively (bails included), the act of hitting these stumps and so dismissing the batsman, and perversely, the act of not being out (Gayle and Sarwan added 257 for the second wicket). Plus any other use you care to think of

Now, can someone please help me understand the example saying: Gayle and Sarwan added 257 for the second wicket. What is wicket here? And does 257 refer to 257 runs scored during a game? Thank you for any help!

Happy the new one! ;)
 
  • tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    257 runs were scored before the second wicket fell, that is, before batsman no. 2 was bowled, caught or run out.

    (edited later) Incorrect. See posts 6 and 10.
     
    Last edited:

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Personally, I think the writer is trying to be deliberately confusing - people often do this when describing cricket.

    "Wicket" as a concrete noun has one primary meaning, the stumps and bails at each end of the pitch. From this, other, derived, meanings emerge, but the only one of any real importance is a batsmen being out. This might be by the wicket being hit in a number of different ways, but it might not involve the wicket (stumps) at all; a caught ball is still a "wicket". Often the verb "fall" is used with "wicket" to indicate this meaning.

    We count the number of wickets that have fallen and use this not only to indicate the score: 145 for 3 (or, in Australia and New Zealand, 3 for 145) means that 145 runs have been scored and 3 wickets have fallen, or 3 batsmen are out, if you prefer.

    Each wicket falling is also a way of dividing up the game. The "second wicket" is the duration between the first wicket falling and the second wicket falling, and it could also be referred to as the second wicket partnership between the two batsmen. If the first wicket fell after 30 runs had been scored, then the total runs scored when the second wicket fell were 287.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This site explains the rules in a nice simple way: Cricket Rules - Cricket Rules

    This is more amusing, but perhaps less simple:

    You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

    When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game.
     

    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    257 runs were scored before the second wicket fell, that is, before batsman no. 2 was bowled, caught or run out.
    To be precise, 257 runs were scored after the fall of the first wicket and before the fall of the second.

    And a Happy New Year to you, Kemot.
     

    kemot

    New Member
    Polish - Poland
    Thank you everyone for your input, now I have the picture, however I am confused with the fall o wicket because as far as I get it the wicket - more or less - falls only when the batsman is bowled. Anyway, I understand that when one says that „the wicket fell” it means the batsman was out.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    as far as I get it the wicket - more or less - falls only when the batsman is bowled.
    Or stumped, run out or out hit wicket (these are off the top of my head, there may be more). However, as I said earlier, even if the batsman is out caught, this is still a "wicket".
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hmm, does it mean it was the second batsman only who scored 257 runs?
    The two batsmen between them scored 257 runs (including extras) between the fall of the first wicket and the fall of the second wicket. One of them may well have scored previous runs, before the first wicket fell, and one of them may have gone on to score further runs after the second wicket fell.
     
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