Wide it goes

stuupid

Banned
Sundanese
I'm wondering why this sentence "wide it goes" is? Shouldn't it be "it goes wide?"

West Ham 0-2 Man City
71: CHANCE! Should have been the hat-trick! Grealish digs out a cross from the left and Haaland gets across his marker. His header has power but lacks direction. Wide it goes

West Ham 0-2 Man City highlights
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Putting the adverb first tends to imply expectation. Something you could have predicted would, or at least might, happen.

    A similar example… a young kid is fooling around at the edge of a swimming pool and then (predictably) topples in: And in he goes! Or a cat or dog is trying to knock a piece of food off a table and finally succeeds: And down it comes!
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Putting the adverb first tends to imply expectation. Something you could have predicted would, or at least might, happen.

    A similar example… a young kid is fooling around at the edge of a swimming pool and then (predictably) topples in: And in he goes! Or a cat or dog is trying to knock a piece of food off a table and finally succeeds: And down it comes!
    That's a great insight. I have been trying to think of an exception but I can't find one. Even if there is a choice of actions, it is expected that at least one of the actions will be taken.

    Example

    The rat is trying to escape the dog. It comes to a place where it can go one of two ways, left or right. Left it goes!

    So the expectation is that the rat will either go left or right - it is not expected to stop. Therefore lingobingo's rule still holds.
     
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