wildlife reservation

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Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
Hello,

Can the word "reservation" be used in the context of an area of land set aside for protecting its natural habitat with its fauna and flora? Does it sound idiomatic? For example would it be OK to say "natural reservation" to mean "natural reserve"?



nature reserve
n
1. (Environmental Science) an area of land that is protected and managed in order to preserve a particular type of habitat and its flora and fauna which are often rare or endangered

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003


I'm asking because I was taught to use "reserve" in this type of context and I know "reservation" in this meaning:
a tract of public land set apart for a special purpose, esp. for the use of Native American people.
http://www.wordreference.com/definition/reservation

that is used in realation to the land for native American Indian peoples. However, I've come across in my book for French vocabulary the term "wildlife reservation" offered as a translation of a French term and I've seen it on some websites on Google.


Thank you,
T
 
  • Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I'd say no, you can't say "wildlife reservation." A few people have, but a search of Google News for that term turns up only about four listings, most of which are in countries where English is primarily a second or third language. Whereas "wildlife reserve" has up to 29 pages of listings. Searching for wildlife reservation on Google News without the quotes gives you many listings about wildlife on Native American land and similar topics.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'd say no, you can't say "wildlife reservation." A few people have, but a search of Google News for that term turns up only about four listings, most of which are in countries where English is primarily a second or third language. Whereas "wildlife reserve" has up to 29 pages of listings. Searching for wildlife reservation on Google News without the quotes gives you many listings about wildlife on Native American land and similar topics.
    I agree. The same is true in British English.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thank you both very much.

    A follow-up question: Is "reservation" often used to mean:
    a tract of public land set apart for a special purpose, esp. for the use of Native American people.
    http://www.wordreference.com/definition/reservation
    but not "for the use of Native American people"? I'd like to know whether it ever sounds natural in this meaning when not referring to native American Indian peoples, for example: "natural reservation" (instead of "natural reserve"). Can you, perhaps, think of other examples that pass muster?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I can't think of an example in which 'reservation' means an area set aside for wildlife, for instance, in American English. It would be too confusing; reservation is strongly associated with the areas placed under Native American control.

    Added: I'll take that back. :eek:
    There is a nature reserve in South Carolina called the "James Ross Wildlife Reservation."

    If there is one, there are probably more. :)
     
    Last edited:

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I agree that "reservation" typically conjures up Native American lands.

    A little creative thinking about nature helped me find "water reservation", but I don't fully understand it, to be honest.

    A water reservation is an appropriated amount of water for maintaining a specified instream flow or level of water at a specified point on a stream or water body or in a specified part of a stream or water body for specified periods of time and for one or more permissible purposes.

    http://www.crks.org/wp/?page_id=93
     
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