Will be expired and will expire

Memar

Senior Member
Amharic
Contract number NN076896 will be expired on December 31, 2012
Contract number NN076896 will exipire on December 31, 2012
Contract number NN076896 expires on December 31, 2012


Is there a meaning difference between the above sentences? Can I use all of above tenses interchangeably to notify the expiration date of the contract ?


Thanks for you time and help
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    After the contract expires, it is in the expired state. "Expired" is a past participle used as an adjective: an expired contract. If it expires on Dec 31, 2012, it will be expired from then on: Jan 1, 2013 until forever. Unless it is renewed, the contract will (still) be expired on August 13, 3327.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Will be expired" means that someone else will expire the contract. That doesn't work because "to expire" is not a transitive verb. A person cannot expire something else. Only the contract can expire. If we want to say that a person took action so that a contract is no longer valid, we must use a different verb: cancel the contract, terminate the contract, etc. A contract can be canceled or be terminated, but it cannot be expired.

    If you want to avoid this problem, you can write "The expiration date of contract no. NN076896 is December 31, 2012." (The word "number" is usually abbreviated in this context, though spelling it out is not an error.)
     

    xgll004

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    if Myridon is right, "Expired" is a past participle used as an adjective, why we cannot say "the contract will be expired"?
    From my ponit of view, it just like to say "I will be back".

    please correct me if i am wrong and elaborate the reason. Thank you!
     

    A90Six

    Senior Member
    England - English.
    Contract number NN076896 will be expired on December 31, 2012. :cross:
    Contract number NN076896 will exipire on December 31, 2012. :tick:
    Contract number NN076896 expires on December 31, 2012. :tick:
    Two and three are interchangeable.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It's not that we cannot say "the contract will be expired", it's just that we don't say it, just as we don't say "the contract is expired" (instead we generally say "the contract has expired"). In theory, as Myridon says, 'expired' can be interpreted as an adjective of state, but in practice we don't use 'expired' in that way. As Egmont says, there is a danger of interpreting "will be expired" as a passive construction, which, as he explains, the verb 'expire' doesn't really have.
     

    A90Six

    Senior Member
    England - English.
    A contract will expire on a particular date without any interference from anyone else. If someone were to physically do something in order to make the contract expire, then they would have 'expired the contract'. This does not happen.
    The past tense would say, "The contract has 'expired'."
    "The contract will have expired" gives the past participle.
    In order for the contract to 'be expired', it would involve someone or something doing something to make it expire.
     
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