Will, be going to - It <will, is going to> take place at the theatre,

HyphenSpider

Banned
Spanish, Spain
I'm going to a concert this afternoon and I want to invite my friend. I want to tell him when and where the concert will take place. What do I have to say?

- It is going to take place at the theatre, at about 5.30
- It will take place at the theatre, at about 5.30

Probably it should be "be going to" as we know the date and the time, but "will" sounds nicer to me...

Thanks,
 
  • HyphenSpider said:
    I'm going to a concert this afternoon and I want to invite my friend. I want to tell him when and where the concert will take place. What do I have to say?

    - It is going to take place at the theatre, at about 5.30
    - It will take place at the theatre, at about 5.30

    Probably it should be "be going to" as we know the date and the time, but "will" sounds nicer to me...

    Thanks,

    The second sentence, using "will", is my choice HyphenSpider. :)


    Regards,
    LRV
     

    nircser

    Member
    filipino (Philippines)
    I think you're wrong.
    actually this is the rule for Present Continuous@intentional action


    will-future:
    for (personal) forecasts (hope, assumption etc...)
    --> In 50 years nobody will remember Bill Gates ;)
    [my fears :) ]

    be going to:
    You have personal intentions or plan for it around to express.
    --> I'm going to retire when I'm sixty.
    [but no preparations were made yet]

    if u see that something will pass because of symtoms
    --> She's going to have a baby


    Present Continuous:
    describe fixed agreements. Preparations were already made.
    --> I'm flying to San Francisco next week.
    [because I have planned it]


    Simple Present:
    fixed and definite actions.
    -->The train leaves at 9 pm.
    [you cannot force the guard(british english?)/conductor to come later, so it is fixed in the schedule we can change nothing to this.
    The same is also valid in TV programme, calendar (working time...)]
     
    nircser said:
    why?
    Rule of Present Continuous:
    Definite plans or appointments which are made for the near future.

    now:
    I'm going to take place at the theatre at about 5.30





    Sorry Nircser,

    You cannot say that you personally ("I") will take place somewhere. Only an event can take place.

    It (the concert) will take place at the theatre at about 5.30.

    This is a normal use of the future tense. Not the present continuous.

    I am getting married next month. The wedding will take place on 1st June.

    Not "The wedding is going to take place on 1st June."

    HyphenSpider I advise you to use "will".




    LRV
     

    Kat LaQ

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Yes, will is the correct choice over going to.

    However, the statement is rather formal. It works well for LRV's example about a wedding. But if I were letting a friend know about a concert later today, I would say something like:

    The concert is at 5:30 at the ABC theater. or
    It is at the ABC theater and starts about 5:30.

    Enjoy the concert!
     

    HyphenSpider

    Banned
    Spanish, Spain
    Yes, will is the correct choice over going to.

    However, the statement is rather formal. It works well for LRV's example about a wedding. But if I were letting a friend know about a concert later today, I would say something like:

    The concert is at 5:30 at the ABC theater. or
    It is at the ABC theater and starts about 5:30.

    Enjoy the concert!

    Actually I'm not going to a concert :D

    Do you think it is too formal for a "false letter" (it is a composition for school)?
     
    HyphenSpider said:
    I'm going to a concert this afternoon and I want to invite my friend. I want to tell him when and where the concert will take place. What do I have to say?

    - It is going to take place at the theatre, at about 5.30
    - It will take place at the theatre, at about 5.30

    Probably it should be "be going to" as we know the date and the time, but "will" sounds nicer to me...

    Thanks,


    Now that we know you are writing an imaginary letter, if you want to include "will" you could say.

    Dear (friend's name),

    There will be a concert at the theatre this afternoon, at about 5.30. Would you like to come with me?

    Yours,

    Hyphen Spider.



    <<See also the WordReference Dictionary entry HERE >>
     
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