Will not you go / will you not go

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  • AlphadogZero

    Member
    Portuguese-Brazil
    Isn't "won't" short for "will not"?Then why is "will not you go" wrong?
    I guess this is what our fellow slovac is asking.And now i join him.
    Share with us some wisdom,please!
     

    AlphadogZero

    Member
    Portuguese-Brazil
    Where I live, "Will not you go ..." can be said, but it is unusual. It is not wrong or non-English.
    Exactly what i thought,due to "won't" being the contracted form of "will not",i don't see why it shouldn't be spoken,it's unnusual,as you said,but it's not wrong i guess.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    due to "won't" being the contracted form of "will not",i don't see why it shouldn't be spoken
    Compare it to "do."

    Do not you find this structure bizarre? :cross:
    Don't you find this structure bizarre? :tick:

    In contemporary English, "don't" and "won't" introduce questions. In older English (probably until the mid-19th century), and in the most refined registers, you may encounter "do you not / do not you" or "will you not / will not you."

    Abbreviate the question words for negative questions. In contemporary English, there's actually a difference in meaning between:

    Don't you think she's pretty? and
    Do you not think she's pretty?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Don't you think that's getting off-topic? = neutral question
    Do you not think that's getting off-topic? = emphatic question; the question expects that youwould naturally and reasonably think that it's getting off topic and is surprised at the fact that you may not think so; in this question "not" sticks to "think": Do you [not-think that's getting off topic]?

    Compare to:

    I don't want to go. = neutral
    I want to not go. = emphatic; the thing that I want is not to go; "not" sticks to "go": I want to [not-go].
     
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