will

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Slavianophil

Senior Member
Russian
Can I use the verb 'will' in the following context: 'Any person under the age of 18, who has committed a crime of minor or medium gravity for the first time, may be relieved from sanctions on condition that coercive measures of educational influence will be applied to them in accordance with the procedure established by the Criminal Code of Turkmenistan'.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would replace "will be" with "are." I realize that doesn't answer your question -- I'm leaving that to someone else.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Will here is an auxiliary, and doesn't usually operate independently of a verb.

    There is a verb to will which is defined by the WR dictionary as to bring about by the exercise of mental powers. We aren't dealing with that here.

    I suspect that your question really is Can the future tense be suitable after on condition that, in a context such as the sentence?

    You are supposed to give your view about that, as a result of your research, before we answer.
     

    Slavianophil

    Senior Member
    Russian
    My view is that after 'on condition that' the verb 'will' is not normally used, although I noticed it in some conditional clauses like: "If you will come with me I'll ask Oz to do all he can for you." Therefore, I am not quite sure when it is possible and when it is impossible to use 'will' in such clauses. And I am a bit unsure about using 'will' and 'shall' and other modal verbs in legal contexts.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The examples in the American Corpus almost always use the subjunctive after on condition that; those in the British one sometimes do.

    I'd be inclined to write, in a formal context, 'Any person under the age of 18, who has committed a crime of minor or medium gravity for the first time, may be relieved from sanctions on condition that coercive measures of educational influence be applied to them in accordance with the procedure established by the Criminal Code of Turkmenistan'.

    I think the subjunctive is more idiomatic than the future here.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Hi
    Why is "will" in the sentence below?
    "Sometimes, a pointer will refer to no object at all. In this case, we give it the special value NIL."
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Please tell us where you found this sentence.
    It's from:

    Introduction to Algorithms, Third Edition, by Thomas H.Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivets, and Clifford Stein

    <Edited by moderator (Florentia52) for readability>



     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Hi
    Why is "will" in the sentence below?
    "Sometimes, a pointer will refer to no object at all. In this case, we give it the special value NIL."
    It's a straightforward use of the future tense "will refer" to describe something happening at some (unspecified) time in the future.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It's a straightforward use of the future tense "will refer" to describe something happening at some (unspecified) time in the future.
    Thank you :)
    Can't I use "simple present"?
    "Sometimes, a pointer refer to no object at all. In this case, we give it the special value NIL."
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Thank you :)
    Can't I use "simple present"?
    "Sometimes, a pointer refer to no object at all. In this case, we give it the special value NIL."
    Yes, you can (except that it should be "refers" ;)).

    Often in a case like that, it's not much more than just the personal choice of the author.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi
    Why is "will" in the sentence below?
    "Sometimes, a pointer will refer to no object at all. In this case, we give it the special value NIL."
    This has nothing to do with future time but is a standard use of the future tense to present a customary action.

    It's meaning 6 in the WR dictionary:

    to express customary action:She will write for hours at a time. Boys will be boys.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    This has nothing to do with future time but is a standard use of the future tense to present a customary action.

    It's meaning 6 in the WR dictionary:

    to express customary action:She will write for hours at a time. Boys will be boys.
    Thank you very much :)
    Does "customary action" mean "habitual action"?
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank you very much :)
    Does "customary action" mean "habitual action"?
    It's an interesting question. I don't see them as quite the same.

    The tense indicates that one action usually follows from another; this may be a habit, or a customary reaction - Boys will be boys doesn't mean that boys have a habit of being boys, but that you can expect boys to behave like boys.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It's an interesting question. I don't see them as quite the same.

    The tense indicates that one action usually follows from another; this may be a habit, or a customary reaction - Boys will be boys doesn't mean that boys have a habit of being boys, but that you can expect boys to behave like boys.
    Thanks a lot for the good explanation :)
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It's an interesting question. I don't see them as quite the same.

    The tense indicates that one action usually follows from another; this may be a habit, or a customary reaction - Boys will be boys doesn't mean that boys have a habit of being boys, but that you can expect boys to behave like boys.
    Hi
    Are these "will"s for future?
    "To use the master method, you will need to memorize three cases, but then you will be able to solve many
    recurrences quite easily, often without pencil and paper."
    From: CLRS
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Well, yes, just like in the first conditional:

    If you want to use the master method, you will need to ...
    Thank you
    Is these "will"s the same with that, please?
    "Professor Caesar wishes to develop a matrix-multiplication algorithm that is asymptotically faster than Strassen’s algorithm. His algorithm will use the divide and-
    conquer method, dividing each matrix into pieces of size n/4 * n/4, and the divide and combine steps together will take theta(n2) time."
    From: CLRS
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    There are various options with "will". It can mean "insist on"; it can mean "want"; or it can simply refer to future time.

    In your sentence, it simply refers to future time.
     
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