Willing accessory

passola92

Senior Member
italian-italia
Can someone help me with this sentence?
I've been trying to understand it for something like 2 months :mad:

Basically Henry has taken a girl for a ride in his car. He pulls over in a clearing near the jungle, suggesting they should stretch their legs. But the author implies that he wants to have sex with the girl.
This is what happens when they get down.

"A partof her wondered how she had ever met Henry, and why she put upwith him – Henry with his leg-stretchings, and his calculation and theway he looked at her as she stepped down from the running-board– but another part of her was merely caught up in the immediacy ofthe scene, and to some extent, however much she distrusted Henry,its willing accessory. If you came out in a car with Henry and he suggested that you stretched your legs, then you stretchedthem. Anything else was prevarication."

After the sentence I've pasted, Henry and the girl do have sex. The girls doesn't want to have sex with him, just like she didn't want to get into his car in the first place. But she doesn't show any kind of opposition because she's got quite a passive demeanor towards her whole existence... She just goes with the flow.


I understood the whole sentence, excluding willing accessory. Is it Henry himself? If so, what does it mean?

 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    She is a willing accessory to the situation she finds herself in – she didn't have to be coaxed or bribed or threatened to be a participant. She knows who Henry is and what he's like, and yet she still comes out with him, so even though she can look at the situation cynically, she did agree to come out with him even knowing what she knows. So she's an accessory: a person who incites someone to commit a crime or assists the perpetrator of a crime, either before or during its commission.
     
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    passola92

    Senior Member
    italian-italia
    AAAAAAH!!!!!!!!!! Okay!!!!! I've racked my head on this sentence for days and it was just that!!!! Thank you so much Copyright!!!!!!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think the syntax may be causing problems. "Its" is confusing because it can lead you to imagine it refers to Henry.

    "...another part of her was merely caught up in the immediacy of the scene, and to some extent [this other part was a] willing accessory [to the scene]."

    Another part of her was to some extent a willing accessory to the scene.
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    AAAAAAH!!!!!!!!!! Okay!!!!! I've racked my head on this sentence for days and it was just that!!!! Thank you so much Copyright!!!!!!
    We seldom say "You're welcome" on the forum because it just adds another post to the thread (and we figure people smart enough to be on the forum have telepathy). But so much gratitude deserves a "You're welcome" – and you are. ;)
     
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