win the black lord

o_O_o

New Member
Korean
What does “to win the black lord” mean?

This is the full sentence:
For the king, for the land, for the mountains, for the green valleys where dragons fly, for the glory the power to win the black lord, I will search for the emerald sword.

It's from the lyrics of the song 「Emerald Sword」

I was taught that ‘win a battle’ or ‘win a contest’ can be, but a person can't be an object of ‘win’. The dictionary says so, and some google search results so.

So, shouldn't it be ‘defeat’? Then why is it ‘win’ in this song? Or, does ‘win’ have some other meaning I don't know?

What does “to win the black lord” mean?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Maybe the songwriter just used win so that the lyrics scanned (had the right number of syllables)?

    As we tell people all the time on this forum, trying to understand song lyrics is not a good way of learning English. They are written with so-called “poetic licence”, which means there’s no requirement for them to make any sense whatsoever.
     

    o_O_o

    New Member
    Korean
    Maybe the songwriter just used win so that the lyrics scanned (had the right number of syllables)?

    As we tell people all the time on this forum, trying to understand song lyrics is not a good way of learning English. They are written with so-called “poetic licence”, which means there’s no requirement for them to make any sense whatsoever.
    Thank you. I'll never be serious with lyrics.
     
    Last edited:

    algodragon

    New Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Hello, o_O_o. (Sorry for the emoticon, writing your username forces it in my post.)

    I know the song you're talking about. It's by an Italian power metal band called Rhapsody (now Rhapsody of Fire).
    European power metal bands are known for using weird phrasing in English, or sometimes, outright using the wrong English words or conjugations in their song lyrics (not that anyone minds, we still love them). That's because most of these musicians are not native English speakers, although they still insist on writing most of their songs in English.
    My point here is that, like lingobingo said, you shouldn't trust song lyrics to learn English for the reason that was already mentioned, but especially if the artist or band's native language isn't English, as is the case of most European power metal bands.

    Anyway, back to the topic. When I learned the lyrics to Emerald Sword, I, too, noticed that the line "to win the Black Lord" sounded strange. Indeed, I immediately realized Rhapsody probably meant to say "to win against the Black Lord", or more likely "to defeat/beat the Black Lord". They probably didn't know (or just forgot) that "win" in English needs the preposition "against" when you're talking about defeating someone. And that's how we ended up with the iconic lyric "For the glory, the power to win the Black Lord". There are other, perhaps less blatant examples of ESL mistakes and unnatural-sounding sentences in Rhapsody's early albums that I've noticed, but that's a topic for another day.
     
    Last edited:

    CaptainZero

    Senior Member
    English, with possible Australianisms
    It's quite possible to win a person in English, though it's an older usage. For example, in the title of this book: How He Won Her. "He won her hand in marriage" is an old idiomatic expression.

    You can also win someone over (see this thread): "He didn't support us at first, but later we won him over." Perhaps the song lyric "the power to win the black lord", is about winning him over.
     

    o_O_o

    New Member
    Korean
    Hello, o_O_o. (Sorry for the emoticon, writing your username forces it in my post.)

    I know the song you're talking about. It's by an Italian power metal band called Rhapsody (now Rhapsody of Fire).
    European power metal bands are known for using weird phrasing in English, or sometimes, outright using the wrong English words or conjugations in their song lyrics (not that anyone minds, we still love them). That's because most of these musicians are not native English speakers, although they still insist on writing most of their songs in English.
    My point here is that, like lingobingo said, you shouldn't trust song lyrics to learn English for the reason that was already mentioned, but especially if the artist or band's native language isn't English, as is the case of most European power metal bands.

    Anyway, back to the topic. When I learned the lyrics to Emerald Sword, I, too, noticed that the line "to win the Black Lord" sounded strange. Indeed, I immediately realized Rhapsody probably meant to say "to win against the Black Lord", or more likely "to defeat/beat the Black Lord". They probably didn't know (or just forgot) that "win" in English needs the preposition "against" when you're talking about defeating someone. And that's how we ended up with the iconic lyric "For the glory, the power to win the Black Lord". There are other, perhaps less blatant examples of ESL mistakes and unnatural-sounding sentences in Rhapsody's early albums that I've noticed, but that's a topic for another day.
    Thank you very much.😘 I didn't know about the band. Your explanation made me fully convinced. by the way I didn't meant to learn English through song lyrics. I just thought I found something I don't know.
     
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