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nikkieli

Senior Member
Bulgaria, Bulgarian
Hi everybody,

Suppose you are a teacher and on a particular day you've got 5 classes, but they don't follow immediately one after another, so you've got some free time between the classes. In my language we informally call this free time as a 'wondow', even as a 'whole'. Do you have a specific word covering the meaning we imply with these two Bulgarian words?
Thank you
 
  • mally pense

    Senior Member
    England, UK English
    You can use "window" exactly the same way in English. For example "I have a window in my schedule at 11am, I can see you then".

    For "hole", I would use "gap", .e.g. "I've a gap in my schedule at 11".
     

    nikkieli

    Senior Member
    Bulgaria, Bulgarian
    Thank you, Mally Pense, I thought about 'gap', but wasn't sure; as for my 'whole' I definitely was thinking about 'hole', of course.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would not expect to see "window" used in that context in AE, at least in the east coast of the USA.

    I would expect to hear "break", "open time", "free time", etc., but not "window".

    We do use the word "window" to refer to a time frame in this sense: The window of opportunity is just 3 short days, after that you will have missed out.

    The meaning is similar, but I would not expect to see it used as you have in your example.
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    In BE, lessons where you are not teaching are simply called "frees" short for "free period."
    "I´ll telephone the travel agency today in my free."
    "I´ve got two frees on Friday so will complete the report then."
    "I lost my free today because I had to cover for another teacher."
     

    mally pense

    Senior Member
    England, UK English
    It tends to be used this way in "business-speak" here, not so much in 'normal' life :)

    Out of your examples, similarly I would not expect to hear "open time" used in this way in British English. The others I can imagine being used.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In BE, lessons where you are not teaching are simply called "frees" short for "free period."
    "I´ll telephone the travel agency today in my free."
    "I´ve got two frees on Friday so will complete the report then."
    "I lost my free today because I had to cover for another teacher."
    We used "free period" when I was in school too (USA) as a student. I don't know what the teachers used for that however.
     

    mally pense

    Senior Member
    England, UK English
    In BE, lessons where you are not teaching are simply called "frees" short for "free period."
    "I´ll telephone the travel agency today in my free."
    "I´ve got two frees on Friday so will complete the report then."
    "I lost my free today because I had to cover for another teacher."
    That's very specific to teaching/schools etc, not really elsewhere as far as I'm aware. Worth noting obviously.
     

    mally pense

    Senior Member
    England, UK English
    But the original question specifically referred to a teacher so presumably what the poster was asking for!
    Not necessarily. The original question supposed that one was a teacher, which I took to be an example, not a specific context for the question, though it could have been. However I would have thought that the two Bulgarian words (for window and hole) were more generic in context than the supposed example.
     
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