windswept

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Tyrion Lann

Senior Member
INDIA -Hindi
The room was windswept, so was he.

Does it sound natural to you all?

A man was sitting in a windswept room and he looked windswept too. (having hair that's untidy because it had been blown in different directions by the wind.)

Thanks.
 
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  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    How can a room be windswept? Were all the windows missing, or even a wall blown away?

    Normally, it's landscapes, or parts of a lanscape that are windswept,. In that case, for instance: A man was sitting on a windswept moor and he looked windswept too would sound perfectly good.

    [Cross-posted.]
     

    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    I thought, Any place which isn't protected from strong winds could be called "windswept".

    Can't a small dilapidated room at the top of a hill be windswept?
     
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    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It can’t. I don’t think you can ever describe a building as windswept. It might be possible for an accomplished writer to make it work in a very specific scenario, but in general the word is simply not used that way, for obvious reasons.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Windswept describes climatic/environmental conditions over many years. It's sort of as semi-permanent condition. And it is generally used as an adjective before a noun - windswept hills, windswept plains, etc.

    The Dust Bowl forced thousands of farmers to abandon the windswept plains of the central United States.

    What I think you could have, on top of a hill, for instance, is the windswept ruins of a castle. It's been sitting there abandoned for many years, exposed to wind and rain and nature. You couldn't describe the individual rooms that way but you could describe the whole thing that way. At this point, it's part of the landscape.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree that it would make sense in the case of ruins of a church or castle, for example, consisting only of walls, ramparts, etc. but no roof.
     
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