Windy vs wind

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Is there a difference in the meanings conveyed by "windy" and "wind" (context: current of air produced by nature moving) in the examples I made below?

a. It is windy today. Vs There is a lot of wind today. [what is the difference here?]
b. It is a little windy today. Vs There is some wind today. [what is the difference here?]

Thank you in advance!
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "There is a lot of wind today." and "There is some wind today." are not very commonly said. When commenting on the weather, the "It's..." version is far more popular.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "Windy" is not a precise term. It depends on what you think "windy" means.

    I think that "windy" means both of those examples - I advise you to add an adverb (very/a little/somewhat, etc) to windy to avoid the confusion that you have found.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    No one will know exactly how windy it is unless you tell them. We don't just look at words and imagine what they might mean – we expect to be told.

    It's a bit windy today.
    It's rather windy today.
    It's very windy today.
    It's extremely windy today.
    It's so windy that we're taping the windows and taking the pot plants off the wall.
     
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