Windy

cuchuflete

Senior Member
EEUU-inglés
Do you use windy for winding? If they mean the same, how does the poor learner of
English know when to say windy (rhymes with Cindy) and when it's windy (rhymes with...err... wine dee)?

"We're still in the race and we're still competing for delegates, and today demonstrates how long and windy to the White House this is," said Chip Saltsman, Huckabee's campaign manager.
Now I know that one definition of windy is flatulent, but somehow I suspect that's not what Huckabee's campaign manager had in mind.
 
  • Forero

    Senior Member
    I'm afraid we just have to guess. I would guess the campaign manager said "wine-dee".

    I have walked on and talked about windy ("wine-dee") roads on several occasions, never stopping to think about the spelling.

    P.S. Where I come from, "Wendy" also rhymes with "Cindy" and sounds just like the "windy" we use for the turbulent weather of two days ago.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I agree with everything Forero has said (except that Wendy doesn't rhyme with Cindy
    in this corner of the AE sandbox). I opened this thread after checking half a dozen
    AE dictionaries, none of which had windy as a description of a meandering path.
    Interesting that the Compact OED has definitions for both uses, including...

    windy2

    /windi/
    adjective following a winding course.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The "big" OED has it too, with the definition Of a road, path, etc.: that winds about; tortuous, twisting.

    Interestingly, though, the first example given is from 1972: maybe it's relatively new.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think I would have used winding rather than windy in the original sentence.
    Perhaps influenced by the Beatles, perhaps not, winding seems more natural.
    But windy (wine-dee) is OK too, though I don't think I would use it in a formal context.
     

    alacant

    Senior Member
    England, english
    I think I would have used winding rather than windy in the original sentence.
    Perhaps influenced by the Beatles, perhaps not, winding seems more natural.
    But windy (wine-dee) is OK too, though I don't think I would use it in a formal context.
    I agree with panjandrum.

    The long and winding road seems better to me, I don't think I would use long and windy.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I certainly use both. I'd probably go for winding in writing if there was likely to be confusion. If something is particularly sinuous I might say windy-twindy [wine-dy twine-dy]: this is probably the first time I've ever written that down, and it looks really daft. Does anyone else use this, I wonder?
     

    alexacohen

    Banned
    Spanish. Spain
    I haven't got any trouble because I have studied English as my second language.

    So,
    windy is the horrid weather we had yesterday which caused the deckchairs on my verandah to fly somewhere unknown,
    and
    winding is the path I follow when I walk into the forests, very much like the one Little Red Riding Hood followed to meet the Big Bad Wolf.

    (My pronunciation is horrid either way, so no big deal. Sounds awful whatever I say)
     

    speedier

    Senior Member
    Well, I can't seem to find it online, but some famous person once said:

    I can fin(e)d it in my min(e)d to say win(e)d,
    but I can't find it in my mind to say wind.

    where all the -ind words in the last line are pronounced as in in:D

    Also, I'm sure that when I was younger I used to say win(e)dy road, and win(e)dy toy (for wind-up toy).

    Just thought I'd share that with you, but in common with some of the others, I'm much too grown up to say things like that now ................ I dunno though.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, I'd say "winding", although I would immediately understand "wine-dy". It sounds a bit child-like (not always a bad thing) to me.

    I have never said "wine-dy twine-dy", but I do often say "twisty turny". I think I got that from Blackadder.

    Ewie, don't be embarrassed - it's a lovely turn of phrase, mate.

    I was nine in 1972.
     
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