Wine and laughter make the food taste better

sjt2900

New Member
US-English
I'd like to have these phrases written in my kitchen. My grandparents are deceased and my mother says although she could speak Italian, she never could write it. I would really appreciate any help.

"Wine and laughter make the food taste better."

"Celebrate the Family!"

Thanks
 
  • Italian Girl

    Member
    Italy Italian
    "Il vino e le risate fanno (or "rendono") il cibo più buono", or even "Il vino e le risate migliorano i sapori"

    "Onora la famiglia!"
     

    sjt2900

    New Member
    US-English
    Italian girl, Thanks so much for replying. If I use "Il vino e le risate migliorano i sapori" does that change the meaning at all? Its a little shorter and may fit on the wall better. Or, with other sentence, do I switch "rendona" with "risate fanno" or just "fanno". I'm not sure how much will fit until the painter gets here.

    Also if I want to say "Drink" as in "Drink the Wine." Do I say "Bere"?
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I also propose: "con vino e risate, tutto ha più gusto!" oppure "con vino e allegria, tutto ha più gusto!"

    "Onora la famiglia" sounds like a commandment! Honor thy Father and thy Mother... Celebrate is more like 'festeggiare', or even meaning praise I suppose... then I would say: "Esalta la famiglia!", meaning you give prominence to it, it's a way to bring it out (from esaltare = to exalt, to magnify, to elevate...)

    What do you think?
     

    sjt2900

    New Member
    US-English
    Silviap--I looked up exalt and found "sing the praises of" which is exactly what I'm trying to say. I believe the "Family" as a whole is important and that's what I'm trying to say. I'm very proud of mine and want to say it. Would Celebrare la Famiglia work? Or is this too literal?
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Yes, that's fine, too, though it can be a little literary:
    'celebrare le gesta dell'eroe'
    or also:
    'celebrare una messa'
    You can say "celebra la famiglia!", it's just a little unusual, somehow it would recall officiating something, and it sounds more formal.

    I hope this helps
     

    sjt2900

    New Member
    US-English
    Ok, so, how would you say "Sing the praises of the family?" Or, "Praise the Family" I like the sound of that more than the word "exalt."
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao sjt,

    I would discard "loda la famiglia" (it doesn't sound good), "tessi le lodi della famiglia" or "decanta la famiglia" (too formal, literary), same thing for glorificare, magnificare and elogiare. Why don't you just go for a simple:
    Evviva la famiglia!
    It started like a wish/cheer for "long live...", but nowadays that would also mean "family's great", "there's nothing like family".

    The problem is, are you just looking for a literal translation or do you want something sounding actual Italian? If you like how it sounds in English, why are you trying to say that in Italian?! :D

    My suggestion if you're not sure yet: wait for some other opinions from other Italian people!

    Also, in Italian we don't use caps at the beginning of each word. The rule for caps is:
    - starting a sentence or after a full stop (period), usually after an exclamation mark/point etc.
    - for proper nouns (Florence, Mississippi, John...)
    - for acronyms (but not compulsory)
    - for courtesy (forma di cortesia) addressing someone in legal/commercial/formal letters
    Ex.: Alla cortese attenzione del Signor (o Sig.) Rossi (to the kind attention of Mr Rossi)
    Abbiamo ricevuto la Vostra lettera (we have received your letter)

    And to answer your previous post:
    drink the wine = bevi il vino (or bevi vino, depending on the context, but not on its own)

    P.S.: The word Evviva is often written W in graffiti (without s cause it's already plural)
     

    sjt2900

    New Member
    US-English
    silviap--I really appreciate your help. I love "Evviva la familigia!" I'm trying to accomplish two things here. I want to say how important I believe the family unit is and to remind myself of my family heritage. I used to hear the language spoken on a daily basis. As children, we were never properly taught to speak Italian, but we got so we could understand a lot of what our parents and grandparents were saying. My mother is the youngest of 13 children, half of which were born in Ialy. Since we have lost our grandparents and a lot of aunts and uncles, we don't hear the language spoken much anymore and this way I hear it and think of them every day. Thanks again!
     

    Nick Raider

    New Member
    Italy - Italian
    Dear Sjt,
    your message have really impressed me so I decided to write you.
    I think you should adapt your sentences in a correct and usual way by writing:
    "con vino e allegria tutto ha più gusto!" (without comma). In fact "laughter" is not appropriate in this context, I mean we're not talking about a joke but better cheerfulness, good cheer..
    Also "vino e allegria migliorano i sapori!" (wine and cheerfulness make taste better).

    About Family I think it could become "Ama la famiglia" (love your family) if you're going to substitute "honour" or "la famiglia è vita" (family is the life) that means the family is the most important value in your home.

    Good luck and let me know

    Nicola
     

    Italian Girl

    Member
    Italy Italian
    Italian girl, Thanks so much for replying. If I use "Il vino e le risate migliorano i sapori" does that change the meaning at all? Its a little shorter and may fit on the wall better. Or, with other sentence, do I switch "rendona" with "risate fanno" or just "fanno". I'm not sure how much will fit until the painter gets here.

    "Il vino e le risate migliorano i sapori" literally means "Wine and laughter make flavours better".
    In the first sentence I wrote, rendono can replace only the verb fanno.
     

    sjt2900

    New Member
    US-English
    Sorry I haven't gotten back to you. My family has decided they want "la famiglia è vita". Thanks Nick! That say's exactly what I'm trying to express.

    I'm still confused on the "Wine and laughter make food taste better". A friend offered "Con vino e risate il cibo ha più gusto." How do you all feel about this?
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I agree with Walnut.

    "La famiglia è vita" doesn't sound too familiar... it sounds from the South ;)

    "La famiglia è la vita" Che ne pensano gli altri italiani?
     

    walnut

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    silviap said:
    "La famiglia è vita"... Che ne pensano gli altri italiani?
    Mmm... Sounds correct but a bit old-fashioned. What about "Vita in famiglia" (Family life)? Doesn't mean the same and not assertive the same, but to an italian ear (mine! :p ) sounds maybe sweeter and domestic. Like if you wasn't declaring something, but just looking at it. Che ne pensate? Walnut
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    It sounds ordinary, I don't think that's what he wanted to say...

    Do you prefer "la famiglia è vita" or "la famiglia è la vita"?
     

    Nick Raider

    New Member
    Italy - Italian
    Cari tutti,
    "la famiglia è vita" non ha alcun link con tradizioni del sud o modi di dire, tanto meno oldfashioned.
    Mi spiace proprio aver letto una serie di commenti totalmente sbalorditivi da poter fornire ad una persona straniera che ha espresso un desiderio preciso, quello di valorizzare e riassumere l'essenza e l'assetto di valori che la famiglia ed assume nella sua quotidianità, nella sua casa.
    Qui non si tratta di capire se è più corretta una virgola o meno, qui si tratta di allargare un minimo le vostre vedute allargando sensibilmente il valore che quel concetto vuole esprimere.
    La famiglia nella vita di Sjt2900 è la sua vita, quindi, "la famiglia è vita" che suona oltremodo profondo e poetico.

    Vorrei chiedere gentilmente a qualcuno più bravo di me con la lingua inglese (magari qualche Senior) di voler tradurre questo messaggio a Stj2900.

    Grazie profondamente
    (che non significa che sto affondando, ma che sento nel profondo questo valore da condividere).

    Nicola
     

    walnut

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Nick Raider said:
    oldfashioned
    Ciao Nick! Ho usato (a bit) oldfashioned riferendomi al tipo di italiano usato nella frase perché secondo me non è del tutto soddisfacente. Poi ho provato a trovare una forma migliore per esprimere lo stesso concetto con un'espressione stilisticamente più attuale... ma non mi viene niente di meglio! ;) Ciao! Mi dispiace per il qui pro quo, Walnut
     

    Graziella

    Senior Member
    Argentina - Spanish
    Ciao Nicola,
    Sono assolutamente d'accordo col tuo messaggio. Purtroppo non sono Italiana, nemmeno Inglese, ne Senior.
    "Res non verba"
    A presto. :)
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao Nicola,

    non te la devi prendere, davvero. Lo scopo di queste discussioni è aiutare gli altri a trovare la soluzione migliore ai quesiti che di volta in volta vengono posti, esprimendo il nostro personale punto di vista. Io ho solo espresso il mio, ed ho invitato tutti gli altri ad intervenire.

    Le nostre idee possono essere divergenti, anzi mi stupirei del contrario :)

    Perciò, alla prossima!

    Silvia

    P.S.: Chissà cos'ha deciso sjt!
     
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