with a shrug

Sirius77

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi,

Could you please reprase the "with a shrug" part, in the sentence below.

"On 15 August 1947, with a shrug, the collaborator joined the freedom fighter."

Shrug means "to raise your shoulders and then drop them to show that you do not know or care about something" but in this sentence it comes to me that is means "with the blink of an eye."

Source: Histories of Nation, Ed. Peter Furtado.

Best wishes and thank you.
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    To the best of my knowledge, "with a shrug" never means "with [or, as we say it, in] the blink of an eye."

    Can you give us some more context? Without anything further, I would say it means that the collaborator decided it wasn't worth fighting any more and (metaphorically) shrugged, showing that the collaborator has decided that his position was not so important any more.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Why do you think that it doesn't mean "with a shrug"? If you gave us some context we might know what is happening and why he shrugged.
     

    Sirius77

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hi,

    its about the indepence process of India.
    There were Indians who collaborated with the British rule (fight for them against the Indians in wars etc.). And there were the freedom fighters who aspired for the freedom of India. But in 1947, the collaborator, with a shrug, joined forces with the freedom fighter.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is a metaphorical shrug - the British were leaving, so the collaborators wanted to be on the winning side, I suggest.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top