with her mother

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Please help me.
I don't know where to put the prepositional phrase.
1. She went to see a doctor with her mother about her cold.
2. She went to see a doctor about her cold with her mother.
Thanks.
 
  • nmuscatine

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Who has a cold, "she" or "her mother"?
    If the subject of the sentence, "she," is the one who has the cold, then you should say "She went to see a doctor about her cold with her mother." because it is clear that "she" is the one who has the cold, not "her mother."

    "She went to see a doctor with her mother about her cold." is a little more awkward. In this sentence it is impossible for the reader to know whether "she" has the cold or "her mother" has the cold. Also, I don't think that this version flows as well.

    Another possibility which is grammatically correct is "She went with her mother to see a doctor about her cold." But this sentence also has the problem that we do not know which of the two people has the cold.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thanks Bioche but you have changed my sentence.
    I want "with her mother' in my sentence.
    Thanks nm. Your analysis helps me a lot. And I recognise that it isnot easy to put a prepositional phrase.
    Thanks.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    She went with her mother to see a doctor about her cold.
    This feels the most natural to me, but it is very unclear who has the cold.
    With her mother, she went to see a doctor about her cold. This flows less well, but is more clear. I prefer it over your #1; I cannot decide whether it is better than your #2.
     
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