with music on, with the A/C on

saminkorea

Member
Korean
Hi!
While i was studying i found thuis sentence on google.
"Does Driving With The AC On Actually Use More Fuel? "

I also hear "without music on" in sentences...

i dont understand how these work...

i thought the following makes more sense..

1. i enjoy studying without having music on or without music on.
2. I spent the last summer without having the AC on or without the AC.


Can you please tell me which is right and why?
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I don't know what an A/C is*, and I don't think that music is more or less fuel-economic than speech. I'd say: "Does driving with the radio on..."

    * ...other than alternating current.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    AC is air-conditioning. "On" or "off" describes the state of the AC or music. Contrast:

    We can't live in this house without AC.
    We can't live in this house without the AC on.


    The first could suggest that there is no AC installed at all; the second specifically means that there is, and that it has to be running for us to stay there.
     

    saminkorea

    Member
    Korean
    I don't know what an A/C is*, and I don't think that music is more or less fuel-economic than speech. I'd say: "Does driving with the radio on..."

    * ...other than alternating current.
    I don't know what an A/C is*, and I don't think that music is more or less fuel-economic than speech. I'd say: "Does driving with the radio on..."

    * ...other than alternating current.
    Thank you for your help!
     

    saminkorea

    Member
    Korean
    AC is air-conditioning. "On" or "off" describes the state of the AC or music. Contrast:

    We can't live in this house without AC.
    We can't live in this house without the AC on.


    The first could suggest that there is no AC installed at all; the second specifically means that there is, and that it has to be running for us to stay there.
    Oh.. i got it! Thank you so much!
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Often "on" and "off" mean "turned on" and "turned off".

    Does Driving With The car's AC turned On Actually Use More Fuel (than driving with the car's AC turned off)?
     
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