with that said

  • icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    Hi, welcome to the forums angel! :)

    "With that said, he got up and left the meeting."
    We could rewrite this as "Having said that," or "After saying that."
    It could also mean that someone else said something and then "he" left.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It's sort of a qualifier. For example, I could be trying to convince you of the rightness of my opinion on a certain subject but then I might say:

    "With that said, I will admit that your argument does have some merit."

    Another way of qualifying is something that I say (quite often, I'm afraid):

    "Having said that, I will admit that your argument does have some merit."

    It simply means that although I've said such-and-such, I do concede certain points in the argument.
     

    icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    Perhaps you are right, Dimcl, and I know many speakers use it when making a concession. Were it "that said" without "with" I would have immediately given your definition; however, "with" to me suggests implications for what follows, such as "in the moment following that statement." I always just say "that said."
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Member Emeritus
    English - England
    I must say I hear concessive force in the way this is often said.

    So I can imagine its being used in Dimcl's proposed:

    "With that said, I will admit that your argument does have some merit."

    It is often said on other occasions where though could be alternatively used:

    "(Long argument on the dangers of global warming), with that said we mustn't forget that countermeasures would be very costly too."

    In a less obviously idiomatic sense, I can also imagine it in Icecreamsoldier's more literal:

    "With that said, he got up and left the meeting."
     
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