with the middle class squeezed

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grammar-in-use

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone!

Do the following two sentences have the same meaning?

a. About half of U.S. jobs are at high risk of being automated, according to one recent study, with the middle class disproportionately squeezed.

b. About half of U.S. jobs are at high risk of being automated, according to one recent study. And the middle class may be disproportionately squeezed.

Here is their context:

Among the vexing challenges facing the middle class is one that will probably go unmentioned in the next presidential campaign: What happens when the robots come for their jobs?

Don’t dismiss that possibility entirely. About half of U.S. jobs are at high risk of being automated, according to one recent study. And the middle class may be disproportionately squeezed. Many lower-income jobs, such as gardening or day care, don’t appeal to robots. But many once-secure middle-class occupations -- trucking, financial advice, optometry, software engineering -- have aroused their interest, or soon will. (The rich own the robots, so they’ll be fine.)

Thanks in advance!
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The sentences do not mean the same thing. The original form indicates that it is possible (but not guaranteed or certain) that the middle class may suffer disproportionately. Your change to (a.) makes the result no longer a possibility, but a definite finding of the study.

    (Also note that despite the impression given by materials that learners use, native speakers never use "sth" as an abbreviation for "something", and most would have no idea what these letters mean. if you want to be understood by native speakers, you must write out the full word "something." I am sure that a moderator will change the title of your thread, and then remove this comment -- but please understand why the title will be changed.)
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    In B, you have a "may be squeezed" – you don't have that meaning in A, which says that it "will be squeezed."

    Cross-posted.
     

    grammar-in-use

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The sentences do not mean the same thing. The original form indicates that it is possible (but not guaranteed or certain) that the middle class may suffer disproportionately. Your change to (a.) makes the result no longer a possibility, but a definite finding of the study.
    Thank you for your clear explanation and the side note:)

    I've been taught that the "with something done" construction normally expresses a cause or reason rather than a result. But it seems to express a result in sentence "a". That's why I asked the above question. So, can this construction express both a reason and a result?:confused:
     

    grammar-in-use

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In B, you have a "may be squeezed" – you don't have that meaning in A, which says that it "will be squeezed."

    Cross-posted.
    Thank you very much, Copyright!

    Shall we put aside "may be squeezed" VS "will be squeezed" and discuss whether "with something done" can express a result or a reason?:)
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Thank you for your clear explanation and the side note:)

    I've been taught that the "with something done" construction normally expresses a cause or reason rather than a result. But it seems to express a result in sentence "a". That's why I asked the above question. So, can this construction express both a reason and a result?:confused:
    If you want to put aside the issue of "may" vs. "will", could you rephrase your example to eliminate that difference?
     

    grammar-in-use

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If you want to put aside the issue of "may" vs. "will", could you rephrase your example to eliminate that difference?
    It seems hard to eliminate the difference. OK, let me put it this way - is sentence "a" grammatically correct?

    a. About half of U.S. jobs are at high risk of being automated, according to one recent study, with the middle class disproportionately squeezed.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    All I can say is that I would prefer this:

    a. About half of U.S. jobs are at high risk of being automated, according to one recent study, with the middle class being disproportionately squeezed.
     

    grammar-in-use

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    All I can say is that I would prefer this:

    a. About half of U.S. jobs are at high risk of being automated, according to one recent study, with the middle class being disproportionately squeezed.
    Thank you for that. By adding "being", do you mean that "the middle class is being disproportionately squeezed"? Or, could you please let me know what's the difference between "with the middle class disproportionately squeezed" and "with the middle class being disproportionately squeezed"? Thank you in advance.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I believe that it’s grammatically correct without the “being,” but adding it makes the sentence flow better for me.
     
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