With the mission accomplished, and despite their promise,XXXXX

stuartfang

Senior Member
Chinese
From Wikipedia, the Source Code(film) article:
With the mission accomplished, and despite their promise, Rutledge orders Stevens' memory to be erased and stored for reuse in further missions.
Is this sentence correct in both grammar and meaning? I think it is a little bit weird for the underlining part. Can somebody explain this?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, it's quite normal, though it's comparatively rare to see two preposition phrases (PP) at the beginning of a sentence like this. With only one PP, it is very common:

    With the mission accomplished, Rutledge orders Stevens' memory to be erased and stored for reuse in further missions.
    Despite their promise, Rutledge orders Stevens' memory to be erased and stored for reuse in further missions.

    The original sentence is just this with the two PPs used together. There's no clash between them.
     

    stuartfang

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, two preposition phrases (PP). This is what I want to ask about. What if I change the sentense to: Despite their promise, and with the mission accomplished, Rutledge orders Stevens' memory to be erased and stored for reuse in further missions.
    Is it also correct?
     
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