with whom to have amiable conversations

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marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would like to know if the expression in bold is correct in the following:
A tenderhearted fellow with whom to have amiable conversations.
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, marcbatco. There isn't anything wrong with the word order or the grammar in the bold text. It is hard to say anything meaningful about an isolated phrase, however.

    You don't even have a complete sentence for context, so that phrase could be correct or wildly incorrect, depending on the words that come before it and after it.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Hi, marcbatco. There isn't anything wrong with the word order or the grammar in the bold text. It is hard to say anything meaningful about an isolated phrase, however.

    You don't even have a complete sentence for context, so that phrase could be correct or wildly incorrect, depending on the words that come before it and after it.
    Hi owlman5, and thank you for your reply. It is a post in which I provide a description of the friend the post is referred to. Do you believe that it is correct? Or would you include a comma after fellow?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. Thanks for the context. It really helps.

    Do you believe that it is correct?
    Yes, I do. I don't see any need for a comma after fellow. These versions sound a little more colloquial and likely in a casual letter to somebody about a friend: Bob is a tenderhearted fellow who you can have amiable conversations with. Or: Bob is a kind fellow who is easy to talk to.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    You're welcome. Thanks for the context. It really helps.

    Yes, I do. I don't see any need for a comma after fellow.
    And, owlman5, what is the is the difference between ... with whom to have ... and ... with whom you can have ...?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    And, owlman5, what is the is the difference between ... with whom to have amiable conversations and ... with whom you can have amiable conversations?
    There is no real difference in meaning between them. The version with you is a little more personal and is quite suitable in a sentence written to somebody in a letter of introduction.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    There is no real difference in meaning between them. The version with you is a little more personal and is quite suitable in a sentence written to somebody in a letter of introduction.
    And, if you addressing Bob directly, should it not be: Bob, you are a tenderhearted fellow who you can have ...?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If you were addressing Bob directly, you should probably do that although Bob might find the two different uses of you a little confusing in that sentence. This might be a little clearer: Bob, you are a tenderhearted fellow who is easy to talk to.

    In post #4, I used Bob as the imaginary name of a friend that you are referring to in a letter of introduction to somebody else. Perhaps his name is Phil.:cool:
     
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