...with your company?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Jiung, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. Jiung Member

    Taipei, Taiwan
    Chinese, Taiwan
    Hi,

    I am reading a book about resume samples, and find a few sentences with "with" that confuse me.

    1. Rita Marks, an editorial assistant with your company, told me of your plans to expand your accounting department.

    2. I have the education, experience, potential, and enthusiasm to be successful with your firm.

    My question is: Why use "with" in these two sentences, rather than use "in"?

    Many Thanks!

    Jiung
     
  2. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    In 1, 'with your company' means a person employed by your company. The use of with is idiomatic. That's a terrible explanation, but it is the way the language has evolved.
    Consider that company refers to a group of people, as well as a legal entity. One person, the editorial assistant, works with, at the side of, in the companionship of other members of the firm. In would imply a physical location within a physical or legal structure, rather than the association with people implied by with.

    The explanation of 2 is essentially the same. "Your firm" implies a group of people, more so than a legal entity.
     
  3. Jiung Member

    Taipei, Taiwan
    Chinese, Taiwan
    That's a detailed and useful answer. Thanks a lot!
     
  4. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Thank you for making me think! Often our words choices are made more by habit than by conscious choice. It's useful to try to figure out why we do what we do.
     

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