with your IQ, you're unarmed and still very dangerous

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Gabe is guessing at who set him and Ray up. After he sets forth his version to Ray, Ray tells him:
- I think with your IQ, you're unarmed and still very dangerous.
- Okay, Sherlock Holmes, if you're so goddamn smart, you tell me who set us up.

Tango & Cash, movie

I'm not sure if it's a compliment or, on the contrary, rather an insult. Judging from Gabe's reply it's the latter, but is it so obvious? E.g., he says Gabe is "dangerous", isn't that a compliment?
Thanks.
 
  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    It's very much not a compliment. You can be armed with different weapons, and in a non-literal sense your intelligence can be a "weapon". So, he's basically saying Gabe is an idiot, i.e. he is unarmed with IQ. The reason he's dangerous likely has to do with other things.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It's very much not a compliment. You can be armed with different weapons, and in a non-literal sense your intelligence can be a "weapon". So, he's basically saying Gabe is an idiot, i.e. he is unarmed with IQ. The reason he's dangerous likely has to do with other things.
    Thank you.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    When it fits the case, "armed and dangerous" is the description given of people who have committed serious crimes and are sought by the police. Here are examples from news stories. Your quote is play on this familiar phrase.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it's very funny and if anybody were to say that about me I wouldn't know whether to laugh or cry. Probably I'd be pleased, ... sort of, however silly it was. It's amusing.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Yes, it's really funny and amusing, but, still seems to be intended to insult the listener:). Though, may depend on who says this, on the intonation etc:D
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    It's definitely an insult.

    A variation I've heard before is "I won't engage in a battle of wits with you/him - I won't fight an unarmed man."
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    A variation I've heard before is "I won't engage in a battle of wits with you/him - I won't fight an unarmed man."
    The more succinct (and unisex) version: "I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with an unarmed person."
    A variant: "Beam me up, Scotty; there's no intelligent life down here."
     

    Radioh

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Is it ALWAYS an insult or is it another context-based thing? I mean, I thought it could mean quite the opposite "you're so intelligent that you don't need any weapons yet you can still be very dangerous". I think this also makes sense.
     

    Radioh

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    I agree, Vik, but you've left out "and still very dangerous". In your context, it's clearly an insult. And I just wanted to know if it could also mean what I said in my previous post, which was confirmed by Parla. At least it seems so to me.
     
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