Wohin dürfen wir Ihre Bestellung liefern?

Princess Banana

Member
French
Hallo meine Lieben!

Ich bin grade online auf einem Möbelgeschäft und ich habe diese oben gennante Frage gesehen. Ich möchte gern wissen, warum "Wohin
KÖNNEN wir Ihre Bestellung liefern?" nicht geschrieben wird. Sind beide Sätze Synonym? Gilt "dürfen" als stilistisch schöner?


PS: My German really is not that great so if you could explain it in English, you would be awesome, guys!

Danke im Voraus!
 
  • 1Nosferatu2

    Senior Member
    German - standard German/Hochdeutsch
    The meaning is basically the same. The modal verb "dürfen" sounds very polite and for some reason somebody who designed that website decided that "dürfen" should be used. I for one find it almost a bit overkill.
    My choice would be "Wohin sollen wir Ihre Bestellung liefern?", but "dürfen" is fine. and apparently somebody wanted to sound very polite.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It sounds very normal to me. It reminds me of “Wir freuen uns, Sie [location] begrüßen zu dürfen,” which you hear all the time (on trains for example).
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Gilt "dürfen" als stilistisch schöner?
    Ja. ''Dürfen'' originally means ''to have permission''(to do something). That's why it is so often used in such expressions: it is courteous, polite and at the same time 'humble' towards customers.

    In English ''where may we deliver..'' instead of ''where can we deliver..'' (sort of).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    But “may” would not be used here in English.

    The closest idiomatic equivalent I can think of is “Where would you like us to...?”
     

    1Nosferatu2

    Senior Member
    German - standard German/Hochdeutsch
    As I said, “may” would not be used here in English.
    May I interrupt you briefly? - Darf/Kann ich dich kurz unterbrechen?
    You may not use a calculator - Ihr dürft (Du darfst/ Sie dürfen) keinen Taschenrechner benutzen.

    These would be fine, I assume, but not Where may we send your ...
    Right?
    Ta.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Same thing here:
    It sounds very normal to me. It reminds me of “Wir freuen uns, Sie [location] begrüßen zu dürfen,” which you hear all the time (on trains for example).
    Because it is "normal" in one set phrase it doesn't mean it is "normal" in another context. I agree with @1Nosferatu2: It can easily sound over-polite. Depends a bit on the circumstances where it is said.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I thought of formulations like ''May we deliver today, or do you prefer tomorrow? And where may we deliver?''
    But since elroy says it is not idiomatic, I ohne weiteres trust him.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Because it is "normal" in one set phrase it doesn't mean it is "normal" in another context.
    What I meant was, "begrüßen zu dürfen" sounds ridiculous if translated literally into English, but it's completely normal in German, so I didn't find "dürfen" excessive in this context, even though it would sound over-the-top in English. Clearly, my Sprachgefühl failed me this time, although we have to acknowledge the fact that it was in fact used -- and it's likely this wasn't the only time it's ever been used -- whereas in English I don't think "may" or "have the pleasure/honor" would be used.
     

    djweaverbeaver

    Senior Member
    English Atlanta, GA USA
    But “may” would not be used here in English.

    The closest idiomatic equivalent I can think of is “Where would you like us to...?”
    I just want to point out that there's nothing grammatically incorrect about using "may" here. It's just that we wouldn't really use/say it here from an idiomatic point of view.
     
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