won a game of chess from someone

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
[...] and that he had won a game of chess from someone she remembered as Torremolinos but in reality was named Capablanca.
(Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel García Márquez)

Do you say so?

Thanks.


 
  • doubledown

    New Member
    German
    Hi SuprunP,

    a 'game of chess' also refers to the (physical) game itself, i.e. the chess board and the pieces. Also, here 'won' is just a fancy way of saying that he got a game of chess from that person.

    Hope this helps,
    double
     

    ribran

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Hi SuprunP,

    a 'game of chess' also refers to the (physical) game itself, i.e. the chess board and the pieces. Also, here 'won' is just a fancy way of saying that he got a game of chess from that person.

    Hope this helps,
    double
    Welcome to the forums, Doubledown. :)

    I searched both the Corpus of Contemporary American English and the British National Corpus for "have a game of chess," "has a game of chess," "had a game of chess," "having a game of chess," "get a game of chess," "gets a game of chess," "got a game of chess," "gotten a game of chess," and "getting a game of chess." Neither had any. To me, a chess set/chessboard is a very different thing from a game of chess.
     
    Last edited:

    doubledown

    New Member
    German
    Welcome to the forums, Doubledown. :)

    I searched both the Corpus of Contemporary American English and the British National Corpus for "have a game of chess," "has a game of chess," "had a game of chess," "having a game of chess," "get a game of chess," "gets a game of chess," "got a game of chess," "gotten a game of chess," and "getting a game of chess." Neither had any. To me, a chessboard is a very different thing from a game of chess.
    Hi, ribran.

    Up until last year I would have agreed with you no matter what, but then I heard a friend of mine - an American - say that he had gotten a game of chess for Christmas. He has quite a good command of his native language so I thought it would be correct. As a non-native speaker I looked it up, of course, and also didn't find a corresponding reference in every dictionary but in some.

    What do the other native speakers on here say to this?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi, ribran.

    Up until last year I would have agreed with you no matter what, but then I heard a friend of mine - an American - say that he had gotten a game of chess for Christmas. He has quite a good command of his native language so I thought it would be correct. As a non-native speaker I looked it up, of course, and also didn't find a corresponding reference in every dictionary but in some.

    What do the other native speakers on here say to this?
    I think that 'chess game' can quite clearly refer to the (physical) apparatus used in play - especially in AE. "Look mom, I got a chess game for Christmas!"
    I would say that it is far less common in BE, where we tend to say 'chess set' (or chess men).

    I don't really know whether or not I've heard folk refer to the apparatus as a 'game of chess', or whether or not I would consider it odd if I did hear it. The mind is quite capable of reinterpreting on the fly, it might just go unnoticed. It may be that I'm not really fit to comment, because it would sound very natural to me if I were to hear it in French, where 'game' (plain and simple) still carries the meaning of 'set'.

    I certainly don't think it's :eek:. If I were to walk into the 'Chess and Bridge centre' (it's a shop) and say: "I'd like to buy a game of chess", I don't anyone would miss a beat.
     
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