Wonder vs. miracle

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
A. Why you know it's very hardly make a real car by yourself but you still work on it?
B. Because I would like to make a "wonder" or "miracle".

Are they both correct? If so, which one is more common? Thank you.
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Sentence A is gramatically wrong. I imagine you mean something like: "Why are still working at building a car by yourself despite knowing it's very hard?"
    As for sentence B, both "wonder" and "miracle" are usually associated with the verb "to work", or even "to perform" miracles.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Look up wonder and miracle in the dictionary. There is a link to one a the top of this page. Then let us know if you have questions about the difference between them.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Look up wonder and miracle in the dictionary. There is a link to one a the top of this page. Then let us know if you have questions about the difference between them.
    There is a definition of "wonder" is "miraculous deed or event;" I think they are synonyms.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    There is a definition of "wonder" is "miraculous deed or event;" I think they are synonyms.
    Hmmm... Not exactly, although they are very close.

    The literal meaning of miracle is an event which is not possible, but which happens anyway because a god or supernatural force makes it happen. If your legs were cut off, and Jesus (or Buddha or Krisha or Mohammad or the flying spaghetti monster) suddenly appeared and blessed you and then your legs were back on your body and fine, this would be a miracle. However, many people use the word "miracle" more loosely. If your leg was cut off in an accident, and surgeons worked for hours to reattach it, and a year later, after many months of healing and therapy you could walk on it again, you might say "It's a miracle!" It does seem miraculous, but your leg was reattached by science. Maybe you believe that God had a hand in your healing (and maybe you don't) but it isn't as though there is no explanation for how your leg got better.

    People use the word "miracle" to mean something very unexpected and beneficial. This is a bit of hyperbole. But so many people use the word that way that this meaning is in the dictionary.

    A wonder is something that is so impressive that people are filled with awe. If a surgeon could reattach a severed limb that would surely be a wonder.

    So in a way, the two words are synonyms, but they actually have slightly different shades of meaning.
     
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